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University of Gothenburg
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Botan
Photo: Anna-Lena Lundqvist

Physiology & cell biology

Research within physiology & cell biology can be divided into two main lines - plant cell and molecular biology and zoophysiology. Here we study how animals and plants function.

Plant cell and molecular biology

When it comes to plants, focus is on  fundamental aspects about growth, responses to environmental stress and climate change, and production of secondary metabolites. Topics being pursued include functional genomics of marine diatoms, regulatory mechanisms in plant and algal photosynthetic membranes, and mechanisms for acclimation to abiotic stress in crop plants.

Under each heading, we have listed the researchers involved, with links to contact information and possible additional group or project pages.

Adrian Clarke (professor)

Cornelia Spetea Wiklund (professor)

Mats Andersson (researcher)

In addition, there is cooperation with personnel at the Department of Marine Sciences

Cornelia Spetea Wiklund (professor)
Read more about Cornelia's research on the PhoBio page

Mats Andersson (researcher)

In addition, there is cooperation with personnel at the Department of Marine Sciences

Henrik Aronsson (professor)
Read more about Henrik's research

Malte Andersson (researcher)

Cornelia Spetea Wiklund (professor)
Read more about Cornelia's research on the PhoBio page

Angela Wulff (professor)
Read more about Angela's research

Photo: Anna-Lena Lundqvist

Animal physiology

The research in animal physiology addresses fundamental and applied questions in areas of development, growth and metabolism, cardiovascular and gastrointestinal physiology, endocrinology and aquatic toxicology. We use integrative approaches from the molecular and cellular levels to the whole animal. An important subdiscipline of animal physiology is therefore ecophysiology, which is the study of how organisms have adapted to the environment and the mechanisms used to cope with environmental changes. In the face of climate change, which has led to increased temperatures and ocean acidification, this is an area of research that has expanded over the past years, both internationally and at the department.

Focus is on fish and marine invertebrates, using different model organisms - both wild and farmed - depending on the question. An important part of our research deals with question related to sustainable aquaculture.

Under each heading, we have listed the researchers involved, with links to contact information and possible additional group or project pages.

Michael Axelsson (professor)

Erik Sandblom (professor)

In close collaboration with Albin Gräns, SLU

Read more at the ECG-group page

Catharina Olsson (lecturer) - control of gastrointestinal motility with emphasis on autonomic innervation

Erik Sandblom (professor) - control of gut blood flow

Michael Axelsson (professor) - control of gut blood flow

Read more at the ECG-group page

Kristina Snuttan Sundell  (professor)

Henrik Sundh (researcher)

Read more at the  FEL-group page

Elisabeth Jönsson Bergman (lecturer) - appetite regulation, ghrelin and GH-IGF-I function

Björn Thrandur Björnsson (professor)  - growth, energy balance and appetite in fish at different life stages

Read more at the  FEL-group page

Henrik Sundh (researcher) - skin barrier function, wound healing and uptake of  microplastics

Kristina Snuttan Sundell (professor) - gut health and uptake mechanisms

Read more at the  FEL-group page

Erik Sandblom (professor)

Catharina Olsson (lecturer) - aspects regarding autonomic control and gut motility

Michael Axelsson (professor)

In close collaboration with Albin Gräns, SLU

Read more at the ECG-group page

Kristina Snuttan Sundell (professor)

Elisabeth Jönsson Bergman (lecturer

Henrik Sundh (researcher)

Björn Thrandur Björnsson (professor)

Jonathan Roques (researcher)

Focus is on:

  • Development of sustainable aqua feeds – effects on fish growth, nutrition, health and welfare
  • New marine aquaculture species, like wolffish, lobster and sea cucumber
  • Optimisation of recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS)

Read more on the  FEL-group page

Kristina Snuttan Sundell (professor)

Jonathan Roques (researcher)

Read more at the  FEL-group page

 

Collaborations in a project lead by Albin Gräns, SLU

Michael Axelsson (professor)

Erik Sandblom (professor)

Read more at the ECG-group page

The following projects overlap with ecotoxicology, see main research area  Environmental sciences

Malin Celander (professor)
Read more at the CYP-group page

Sculpin
Photo: C. Olsson

What is zoophysiology?

Zoophysiology, or animal physiology, is the study of internal physical and chemical functions of an organism, and how these functions are regulated by hormonal and neuronal signals. To answer physiological questions one often uses an integrative approach, investigating interactions and connections between different organs and at different organisation levels (cells, organs, whole animals).

Fish physiology

The research in Gothenburg has traditionally focused on fish, and still do so today.  Much is fundamental research, aiming at understanding the physiology of fishes to get a deeper understanding of physiology in general. Our research also has a more applied angle, dealing with applications relevant for sustainable aquaculture, conservation, climate change and environmental pollution.