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University of Gothenburg
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Overview of Humanisten.
Photo: Gunnar Jönsson
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Our facilities - Humanisten

Humanisten is just a stone’s throw from Götaplatsen, next to Näckrosdammen Pond and the beautiful Renström Park. The new Humanisten building is the latest addition to the University, with its impressive indoor amphitheatre dubbed ‘Trappan’ and a large study area.

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Students walking side by side at Humanisten.

Indoor amphitheatre

All roads lead to Trappan. At least, they do in Humanisten. This central indoor amphitheatre rises majestically inside the most recent building to be added to the University of Gothenburg, which is in fact an extension to the old Humanisten. There are padded seating areas on Trappan’s tiers where you can discuss with course buddies or listen to lectures from the stage. In addition to Trappan, there are student workstations and glass-walled group rooms. 

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Green details in the emty case room.

Lecture rooms and lecture theatres

Humanisten houses lecture theatres with seating for from 100 to 220 people. There are also lecture rooms of various sizes, and also case rooms and active learning classrooms (ALC) which are equipped to cope with more technically challenging learning situations. 

Café and restaurant

The café Deli Marché Humanisten where you can buy hot beverages, sandwiches and snacks during the day is located on the ground floor. One floor up is Restaurang Näckrosen where you can buy lunch. At the moment, these are closed to limit the spread of the coronavirus infection.

Library

Next to Humanisten is the Humanities Library, which has books and journals in the humanities and cultural sciences. It also contains the national library for gender studies, KvinnSam, donated collections and rarities, as well as old prints, manuscripts, ephemera, and audio and video recordings. 

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Fig leaf in the stair of Humanisten.
Photo: Jessica Oscarsson

Art installations

Artworks feature prominently at the Faculty of Humanities. The latest addition is from Meriç Algun, a Turkish-Swedish installation artist, who has designed three of the installations in the new wing of Humanisten. Bronze fig leaves have been positioned on various tiers of the Trappan amphitheatre. In addition, two group rooms have glass walls containing dried fig leaves, an installation entitled “The Glass Curtain”. Under Trappan, on the second level, visitors can see and listen to the artist reflecting on fig leaves and their place in art.  

Accessibility

The Faculty of Humanities has high ambitions when it comes to accessibility. Outside the main entrance at Renströmgatan there are two handicap parking areas and a large lab-by (stopping place) for vehicles. Tactile paving leads from the lay-by to the Humanities Library and to Humanisten. Inside Humanisten there is tactile paving leading to key functions such as the building orientation map, the Service Centre, disabled toilet, and central lift shaft from which you can access all levels. All lecture rooms, group rooms, etc., are marked in Braille on the building orientation map.