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Seaweed Research Group

Research group

Short description

The Seaweed Research Group at the University of Gothenburg is interested in how seaweeds interact with their environment, how they respond to natural and human-induced environmental changes, and how they can be used as renawable sources of biomass. Fundamental research focusses on genetic diversity, ecology, ecophysiology, microbiome interactions and chemical ecology. This overlaps with more applied research aimed to optimize seaweed cultivation for food, feed and other products.

 

The Seaweed Research Group has a long tradition in seaweed ecology and in particular seaweed chemical ecology. The group has become the largest macroalgal research group in Sweden and research topics today also include ecophysiology, genetic diversity, microbiome interactions and aquaculture.

We study how seaweeds interact with their environment and how they respond to natural and human-induced environmental changes, particularly global changes. The fundamental research is closely linked to the applied work that provide a knowledge base for an economically and environmentally sustainable seaweed cultivation industry.

Rooted in experimental ecology, the group has a strong focus on manipulative experimental work in the lab and the field, both for the fundamental and the applied research.

People & Research interests

Emma Berdan, evolutionary and population genetics
Personal webpage
E-mail: emma.berdan@gmail.com

Per Bergström, aquaculture, bivalve, modelling, IMTA *
Personal webpage
E-mail: per.bergstrom@marine.gu.se

Gunnar Cervin, seaweed aquaculture and marine chemical ecology
Personal webpage
E-mail: gunnar.cervin@marine.gu.se

Swanje Enge, chemical ecology and analytical chemistry
Personal webpage
E-mail: swantje.enge@marine.gu.se

Mats Lindegart, experimental design, statistics, modelling, IMTA*
Personal webpage
​​​​​​​E-mail: mats.lindegarth@marine.gu.se

Göran Nylund, seaweed aquaculture, chemical ecology
Personal webpage
​​​​​​​E-mail: goran.nylund@marine.gu.se

Henrik Pavia, seaweed-herbivore/pathogen interactions, evolution of chemical defences, aquaculture
Personal webpage
​​​​​​​E-mail: henrik.pavia@marine.gu.se

Gunilla Toth, seaweed-herbivore/pathogen interactions, evolution of chemical defences, meta-analysis
Personal webpage
​​​​​​​E-mail: gunilla.toth@marine.gu.se

* IMTA, Integrated Multi-Trophic Aquaculture

Evan Durland, seaweed aquaculture and genetics
Personal webpage
E-mail: evan.durland@gu.se

Luca Rugiu, ecology and physiology of brown seaweeds
Personal webpage
E-mail: luca.rugiu@gu.se

Sophie Steinhagen, seaweed taxonomy, molecular ecology and aquaculture
Personal webpage
E-mail: sophie.steinhagen@gu.se

Matthew Hargrave, seaweed aquaculture, Integrated multitrophic aquaculture IMTA *
Personal webpage
E-mail: matthew.hargrave.2@gu.se

Alexandra Kinnby, bladderwrack Fucus vesiculosus, climate change, and marine chemical
ecology
Personal webpage
E-mail: alexandra.kinnby@marine.gu.se

Kristoffer Stedt, seaweed aquaculture, land-based seaweed cultivation
Personal webpage
E-mail: kristoffer.stedt@gu.se

 

* IMTA, Integrated Multi-Trophic Aquaculture

 

Ylva Fredricsson, aquaculture, bivalve, IMTA (Integrated Multi-Trophic Aquaculture)
Personal webpage
E-mail: ylva.fredricsson@marine.gu.se

Annelous Oerbekke, seaweed aquaculture
Personal webpage
E-mail: annelous.oerbekke@gu.se

Joel White
Personal webpage
E-mail: joel.white@gu.se

Facilities

The Seaweed Research Group is located at the Tjärnö Marine Laboratory with excellent facilities for experimental laboratory and field work. Tjärnö Laboratory has several constant-temperture rooms with running seawater, state-of-the-art equipment for ocean acidification experiments, outdoor tanks and a greenhouse for larger-scaled experiments.

Situated right by Kosterhavet National Park, Tjärnö Laboratory offers easy access to field sampling and experiments. Only 10 minutes by boat, the Seaweed Research Group is running a 2 hectares seaweed test farm where new cultivation techniques and species can be tested. Tjärnö Laboratory also has excellent facilities for chemical and molecular work.