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Visiting Professor Programme 3, 2019 - 2021

Sponsors: Elof Hansson Foundation, The Richard C Malmsten Memorial Foundation

Elof Hansson Visiting Professor Programme in International Business and Trade

Visiting Professor of International Business from University of Otago, New Zealand

"Decision-making approaches and developing international opportunties in unfamiliar foreign markets."

Professional biography
Sylvie is interested in the internationalisation of small and medium sized enterprises as she considers such businesses to be an important form of employment creation. She has extensive experience with cross country research as she has collaborated with researchers from several countries, in particular from Sweden and Finland. She has engaged with business and policy makers in her research endeavours and has received prestigious research grants to fund her research projects.

What are your main research interests?
My main research interests are to discover how small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) use their social and business networks to create opportunities and to innovate, as well as to overcome the challenges such as lack of resources and knowledge about foreign markets. I have studied how entrepreneurs develop opportunities in foreign markets by skilfully combining their resources with their network partners’ resources. I have examined alternative decision making paradigms such as effectuation, unplanned and unexpected internationalisation, which help to provide insights about what actually happens in practice. My research also includes measuring speed of internationalisation and how this speed is connected to firm performance.

How does your research have influence beyond the academic world? Does this include any roles you have beyond the academy?
My research findings have been used by business practitioners and policy advisors to help with their decision making and training. My in-depth research interviews involve extensive discussions with CEO’s, international business/marketing managers and policy makers. During the interviews these particants also benefit from the detailed questioning, which encourages them to reflect on the decisions they make and on the strategic direction of their businesses. In addition, I disseminate emerging findings in seminars to business practitioners and policy makers.

Is teaching still a significant part of your working life? What particular method or approach would you say characterises your teaching?
I have an interactive pedagogical style and have developed the skills to actively engage postgraduate students in class discussions and encourage them to work in teams in small projects during class. I integrate co-operative learning and experiential learning in my teaching and this involves co-ordinating and facilitating class interaction. When preparing teaching materials for my courses I aim for research-led teaching by integrating my own research on networks and internationalisation of small and medium sized enterprises and link it with current developments in research as well as what is going on in the business world.

What specific passions or concerns particularly inspire you in your work?
I enjoy observing what goes on in practice and comparing it to existing academic research, as I recognise the huge gap between these two ‘worlds’. I am keen to advance nascent concepts and theories by studying how entrepreneurs actually make decisions in practice, which helps to take these concepts and theories into the next level of development. My passion in research is to use alternative lenses to observe internationalisation phenomena in practice and to challenge existing assumptions.

Which of your publications would you regard as the most significant and why?
My work on business networks and born global firms because they have significantly influenced this field of research. These research topics challenged traditional theories and provided alternative perspectives on how small and medium sized firms internationalise. The article on "Born-Globals" was awarded the Journal of International Marketing, Hans Thorelli Prize by the American Marketing Association because of its novel contribution. This research was based on New Zealand firms and thus showed how firms from a small open economy approach their internationalisation.

What are you particularly hoping to achieve during your time as a Visiting Professor in Gothenburg?
I would like to share my knowledge with colleagues and students and to form long term research collaborations. I have been infuenced by research from Sweden because of my research collaboration for 22 years with researchers at Uppsala University, where some of the Gothenburg University international business team members also have associations. In addition, I would like to become more embedded in the research culture at Gothenburg University and to improve my understanding of how Swedish firms operate.

Links
http://katalog.uu.se/profile/?id=N6-652
https://youtu.be/UoaQ9BTSGB4

Contact
Would you like to meet Sylvie and/or have an idea for future cooperation?
Send an email to her contact person at the School: Mikael Hilmersson
Or visit her home university website!

Focus areas:

  • Business networks
  • Internationalisation process of entrepreneurial firms
  • Serendipity and internationalisation
  • Foreign market opportunities

Visiting Professor of Economics from Toulouse School of Economics, France

"To confront our responsibilities toward future generations, a universal price of 50€/tCO2 is desirable."

Professional biography
Christian Gollier is an internationally renowned researcher in Decision Theory under Uncertainty and its applications in climate economics, finance, and cost-benefit analysis, with a special interest in long-term (sustainable) effects. He is fellow of the Econometric Society, and won the Paul Samuelson Award for his 2001 MIT book “The Economics of Risk and Time”. With Jean Tirole, he created the Toulouse School of Economics, where he serves as director (2007-2015 and 2017- ). He is the president-elect of the European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists (EAERE). He is one of the Lead Authors of the last two reports of the IPCC on climate change.

What are your main research interests?
Are we collectively too selfish, acting insufficiently for the well-being of future generations, or are we, on the contrary, too virtuous and too long-termist? The determination to fight climate change as a global goal is part of this question. Other applications of my research may be found, for example, in socially responsible investments, the evaluation of public policies (investment in transportation, education, research, water or energy infrastructures), and the preservation of exhaustible natural resources and of biodiversity. Operationally, the myriad of associated decisions are decentralized through price signals (interest rates and risk premiums), expressing the way in which our society values investment projects, long-term saving products, long-dated assets, and more generally, any action that transfers consumption and ecological services across generations. The main objective of my research agenda is to provide operational tools towards the problem of valuing the economic, financial, social and environmental impacts of our actions in favor of the distant future.

How does your research have influence beyond the academic world? Does this include any roles you have beyond the academy?
Over the last two decades, I have been prominently involved in the debate on the long-term discounting controversy that followed the publication of some provocative papers and documents by Martin Weitzman and Nicolas Stern in relation to the measure of the social cost of carbon. I have been a lead author of the 4th and 5th reports of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change published in 2007 and 2013, respectively. I have assisted governments in France, the U.K., Norway, the Netherlands, and others to revise their procedures around evaluating public investment. I advise a large number of public and private institutions around the world on evaluation of their long-term investment projects.

Is teaching still a significant part of your working life? What particular method or approach would you say characterises your teaching?
I teach to PhD candidates for approximately half of my teaching load in Toulouse. In an attempt to make introductory microeconomics more accessible to young students, I decided 3 years ago to also teach this course in the first year undergraduate programs at TSA, with no maths, and with a methodology where we first present facts associated with a policy question before exposing a possible theory. I am part of the CORE project (https://www.core-econ.org/about/) for this.

What specific passions or concerns particularly inspire you in your work?
I am very much involved in the public debate about how to organize the energy transition. I write op-eds in journals, and I participate in radio and tv debates on this matter. A book will come out in early May 2019 (prior to the European Election).

Which of your publications would you regard as the most significant and why?
My MIT book (2001) “The Economics of Risk and Time” is still the international reference in the literature on expected utility theory.

My most useful contribution to the debate on climate change and the social cost of carbon is my Princetion UP book (2013) “Pricing the Planet’s Future”.

What are you particularly hoping to achieve during your time as a Visiting Professor in Gothenburg?
Gothenburg is one of the best places in the world to work on climate economics, and I am eager to become part of that story.

Links
https://www.tse-fr.eu/people/christian-gollier

Contact
Would you like to meet Christian and/or have an idea for future cooperation?
Send an email to his contact person at the School: Thomas Sterner
Or visit his home university website!

Focus areas:

  • Decision under uncertainty
  • Climate change
  • Evaluation of long-term investments and public policies
  • Asset pricing

Visiting Professor of Business Administration, particularly Logistics, from University of Washington, USA

"Solving transportation problems requires collaboration between the public and the private sector."

Professional biography
Dr. Anne Goodchild is Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Washington, and serves as Founding Director of the Supply Chain Transportation & Logistics Center, the latter which launched the Urban Freight Lab in 2016 to bring together the public and private sectors to address the challenges of the urban freight system by engaging in innovative research. She has 15 years of experience leading freight transportation research and is an international border and port operations expert.

She has made significant contributes to transportation engineering in the U.S. and abroad, and has been instrumental in bringing supply chain concepts to freight model architectures. She has worked at the forefront of GPS data applications, identifying observable transportation characteristics that statistically predict transportation behavior.

Dr. Goodchild is the author and co-author of more than 100 research publications. She serves as associate editor for the peer-reviewed scientific journal Transportation Research Record. She chaired the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine’s Transportation Research Board (TRB) Freight and Marine Chairs group, the top national research organization in her field, from 2016 to 2018.

Dr. Goodchild holds both a doctorate (2005) and a master’s degree (2003) in civil and environmental engineering from the University of California, Berkeley, and a bachelor’s degree (with high honors) in mathematics from University of California, Davis. Before earning her Ph.D. she worked for PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP and Applied Decision Analysis Inc. in Europe and North America designing efficient airline schedules and optimizing research portfolios. She joined the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering faculty at the University of Washington in 2005.

She teaches logistics and analysis, global trade, transportation & logistics management, and advises graduate students in transportation engineering.

What are your main research interests?
I am interested in making the freight transportation system more sustainable; allowing people to live comfortably in sustainable cities, particularly in the near-term, by finding solutions that solve problems for both the public and the private sector. I believe solutions should be generated through data collection and a thorough understanding of the problem, and then tested in practice.

How does your research have influence beyond the academic world? Does this include any roles you have beyond the academy?
I feel very strongly that academic research should have influence beyond the academic world, and build this in to the entire research approach. I founded and direct the Urban Freight Lab, a collaboration of public and private stakeholders, who are involved in all steps of the research process; problem formation, testing, and evaluation. I previously served as the Freight Advisory Board Chair for the City of Seattle.

Is teaching still a significant part of your working life? What particular method or approach would you say characterises your teaching?
I love to teach, and feel energized after each lecture. In addition to my normal teaching load at the University, I developed and launched a Master’s program and continue to also teach in that program. I work hard to engage the students when they are present either online, or in the classroom through activities and discussions. With graduate students, I expect they will learn from each other, in addition to learning from me.

What specific passions or concerns particularly inspire you in your work?
I feel passionately about the importance of academic research; and that thinking critically, and using robust methods to draw conclusions from precise and accurate data is essential to solving problems. However, I know that it takes work to translate some of these conclusions and outcomes into changes in practice. I am inspired to do that work, and make sure we use our skills and resouces to improve lives.

Which of your publications would you regard as the most significant and why?
I actually think the series of reports we have produced through the Supply Chain Transportation and Logistics Center are the most signficant, because they have been read by practicioners (http://depts.washington.edu/sctlctr/research/publications). While much of this work has also been published in academic journals, I feel satisfied when I know our research is making a difference in practice.

What are you particularly hoping to achieve during your time as a Visiting Professor in Gothenburg?
I am hoping to compare and contrast the approaches to solving freight problems used in North America and Europe (specifically Sweden and the USA). While we share many of the same challenges, culture, political, and economic structures affect how solutions might be implemented. In doing so, I believe we can strengthen our understanding of solutions, and both find improved mechanisms for improving the quality of life in cities.

Links
http://depts.washington.edu/sctlctr/

Contact
Would you like to meet Anne and/or have an idea for future cooperation?
Send an email to her contact person at the School: Michael Browne
Or visit her home university website!

Focus areas:

  • Goods movement
  • Sustainable freight transportation
  • Transportation logistics
  • Urban freight

Visiting Professor of Economic History from School of Commerce, University of South Australia

"Techniques to hinder competitive markets are not new, as history shows."

Professional biography
I am Professor of Economic and Business History in the School of Business at the University of South Australia. I hold honours degrees in economics, politics and law (all from Australian universities) and my research focuses on Australian economic and business history and comparative studies. My PhD on wealth distribution was awarded the Butlin Prize in economic history in Australia and New Zealand.
I co-edited the Australian Economic History Review for a decade and I am currently a board member of Business History, the Australian Economic History Review and the International Review of Economic Education. I have served on the executive of the International Economic History Association and I am the immediate past President of the Economic History Society of Australia and New Zealand.

What are your main research interests?
My main research interest is motivated at looking at how through history, insitutions (both formal and informal) have influenced economic outcomes for individuals and regions. For example, examining the influence of cartels, and how governments respond to their efforts to inhibit competition has been a recent focus of study. Similarly market stuctures influence who ‘wins’ and who ‘loses’ when resources are allocated – for example how water ( a scarce resource in Australia) is allocated between agriculture and cites; or how certain groups in society benefit from market opportunties while others do not.

How does your research have influence beyond the academic world? Does this include any roles you have beyond the academy?
My work has been used in a Royal Commission on child abuse (presenting estimates of the costs and benefits of offender rehabilitation programs) and I have submitted evidence to parlimentary enquiries in Australia on labour market policies. While only one of many contributions to the enquiries, they did contribute research-based evidence that ultimately shaped policy outcomes.

Is teaching still a significant part of your working life? What particular method or approach would you say characterises your teaching?
Definitely. I have a long-standing interest in teaching (especially economics) and work that I undertook with colleagues that identified first-year students at risk of failure, has been published in several journals and received an Australian Learning and Teaching Council Award for Teaching Excellence. I have also published on students’ conceptions of research and their understanding of threshold concepts in economics. I currently teach both undergraduate and post-graduate courses and I have a particular interest in how students learn economics.

What specific passions or concerns particularly inspire you in your work?
Universties have a responsibility to improve the world – so there is always a lot of work to do! Our research and teaching influences current and future generations and we have a responsibility to undertake this work to the best of our ability. We also have a responsibility to undertake our research without fear or favour and to present our considered opinions based on careful study of the evidence.

Which of your publications would you regard as the most significant and why?
Most recently, the publication that perhaps has been most signficant in its social impact was a multi-authored publicaton on the role of water markets in facilitating adaption to climate change in Australia. Academically, my more important contributions examined the distribution of wealth in South Australia in the late 19th and early 20th century, revealing the real extent of inequality compared to other nations, and the links between the state and the United Kingdom that influenced this outcome. More recently, work with Gothenburg colleagues examining the extent of cartels and how they were regulated has helped break down the view that every nation was somehow special in its response to cartels.

What are you particularly hoping to achieve during your time as a Visiting Professor in Gothenburg?
I will be continuing a long-term collaboration with colleagues in economic history examining cartels and cartel regulation in multiple countries and the institutional frameworks that influenced them. We hope this will result in at least one book and more journal articles. I also hope to undertake some new research, again in economic history, examining the beef-cattle industry in Australia and its international trade links with the rest of the world.

Links
http://people.unisa.edu.au/Martin.Shanahan

Contact
Would you like to meet Martin and/or have an idea for future cooperation?
Send an email to his contact person at the School: Susanna Fellman
Or visit his home university website!

Focus areas:

  • cartel regulation
  • markets
  • income distribution
  • water

Funded by Richard C. Malmsten Memorial Foundation

Visiting Professor of Environmental and Behavioural Economics from University of Kassel, Germany

"Before you think about solutions, you need to understand the root cause of the problem."

Professional biography
Astrid Dannenberg is Professor of Environmental and Behavioral Economics at the University of Kassel. Astrid received her MA in economics at the University of Mannheim and her PhD at the Otto-von-Guericke-University of Magdeburg. She has previously been a Research Fellow at the Centre for European Economic Research in Mannheim, and Columbia University in New York City. In 2014, she was awarded an ERC Starting Grant by the European Research Council for her research project “Human Cooperation to Protect the Global Commons” (HUCO). Astrid has served as a Council Member of the European Association of Environmental and Resource Economics (EAERE) from 2016 to 2019 and is an Editorial Board Member of the journals Economic Inquiry and Environmental and Resource Economics.

What are your main research interests?
My research focuses on human decision-making, the drivers and barriers of cooperation, and how institutions can be designed to promote cooperation. The focus is on traits of human behavior and institutional arrangements that either facilitate or impede the achievement of socially beneficial outcomes. The goal is to better understand human behavior in different contexts and institutional settings, and to share these insights with other researchers, students, policy, and society at large.

How does your research have influence beyond the academic world? Does this include any roles you have beyond the academy?
Our research group tries to share its research results and insights with policy makers and society at large, for example, by presenting them at public events or publishing them through media. We regularly present our research on climate change cooperation at the annual climate negotiations. We are also working together with practitioners who use our research findings in their organizations. For example, we have recently collaborated with a local cinema to find out whether movie-goers are willing to pay for a climate-neutral cinema and how this willingness to pay can be influenced.

Is teaching still a significant part of your working life? What particular method or approach would you say characterises your teaching?
I regularly give courses in environmental economics and behavioral economics. As an experimental economist, I use a lot of classroom games to teach the students; not with real money but sometimes with chocolate or gummy bears. We first play the game, then I tell the students what economic theory predicts for the games, what happens in lab experiments where the games are played for real money, and finally what can be learned from those simple games about the real world.

What specific passions or concerns particularly inspire you in your work?
The observation of people’s behavior; sometimes even my own behavior or that of our research group. It is interesting to see, for example, how social norms in our group emerge and how they are enforced.

Which of your publications would you regard as the most significant and why?
The papers on the effects of climate tipping points on cooperation, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), Nature Climate Change and ERE, have received the most attention so far. Personally, I’m very proud of the papers on institutional formation; an experimental paper with Scott Barrett published in the Journal of the European Economic Association and a review with Carlo Gallier published in Experimental Economics. I learned a lot during this work.

What are you particularly hoping to achieve during your time as a Visiting Professor in Gothenburg?
Gothenburg is the perfect place for me because there are many researchers who use behavioral and experimental economics to study environmentally relevant behavior. I hope that we will finalize ongoing research, initiate new research projects, and most of all that we will learn from each other.

Links
http://www.uni-kassel.de/fb07/institute/ivwl/faculty-chairs/dannenberg-prof-dr/dannenberg.html

Contact
Would you like to meet Astrid and/or have an idea for future cooperation?
Send an email to her contact persons at the School: Olof Johansson Stenman & Åsa Löfgren
Or visit her home university website!

Focus areas:

  • cooperation
  • institution formation
  • experimental economics
  • individual and group behavior

Visiting Professor of Innovation, Entrepreneurship, and Management of Intellectual Capital from University of Côte d’Azur, France

"The paradox of routines functioning is the (n) ever changing word."

I am interested in how patterns of actions and routines change and how this may create new opportunities for companies towards sustainable innovations. I observe the difficulties to go in this direction and how Grand Challenges may boost change for companies and citizens. In France I am currently involved in many experiments in transport and mobility with SMEs and large Companies to observe possible change of habits and routines.

Professional biography
I am currently Research Professor at Université Côte d’Azur and CNRS (national scientific research center) and President of the EAEPE (European Association for Political association), I am editor of the Review of Evolutionary Political Economy (REPE) and advisory Editor of Journal of Evolutionary Economics.

What are your main research interests?
I am interested to observe the various sources of change within organizations and for citizens. What are the drivers of these changes? How may individuals and organizations perceive change as an opportunity or as an effortful task ? I like to scrutinize potential lock-in within individuals and organizations and to assess the influence of the structures (such as national innovation systems or technological paradigms) for framing these opportunities).

How does your research have influence beyond the academic world? Does this include any roles you have beyond the academy?
I was the first researcher to obtain quantitative data in France on the impact of smart meters for decreasing energy consumption. I contribute to many public debates through interventions in schools, with local television and on national radio, especially relating to questions of the ecological and energetic transition. I am part of many local French associations that disseminate science to wider audiences. I like to be challenged by diverse audiences.

Is teaching still a significant part of your working life? What particular method or approach would you say characterises your teaching?
Yes. I like to teach by explaining my empirical findings (ecological innovation in the French Bordeaux viveyard, changes of energy habits observed in field experiments) and step-by-step introducing some critical notions such as routines or habits. I have a grounded teaching approach based on cases studies for developing more fundamental understandings.

What specific passions or concerns particularly inspire you in your work?
Grand Challenges, especially climate change, are a source of permanent inspiration that motivates my research.

Which of your publications would you regard as the most significant and why?
My articles with Sidney Winter & R. R Nelson and Martha Feldman & Brian Pentland on organizational routines. They had a significant impact for advancing the theoretical background of routines and to build a community of researchers and challenged the conventional wisdom of inertia. I am also very proud of my work with Kevin Maréchal on habits and evolutionary economics for tackling the issue of climate change.

What are you particularly hoping to achieve during your time as a Visiting Professor in Gothenburg?
I am looking forward to working with Professor Maureen Mc Kelvey and with IIE’s doctoral students on organizational routines and entrepreneurship in Sweden and especially on the impact of governance issues for implementing change. I would like to compare French and Swedish entrepreneurship to see how and why they may differ.

Links
www.nathalie-lazaric.fr

Contact
Would you like to meet Nathalie and/or have an idea for future cooperation?
Send an email to her contact person at the School: Maureen McKelvey
Or visit her personal homepage!

Focus areas:

  • Organizational routines and entrepreneurship
  • Ecological innovation
  • Behavioural change and habits
  • Sustainable consumption

Visiting Professor of Ocean Governance Law from Nelson Mandela University, South Africa

"Equitable and transformative ocean governance is essential for humankind’s survival."

Professional biography
I hold a licence en droit from Brussels Free University as well as an LLM and LLD from the University of Cape Town. I joined Nelson Mandela University (then the University of Port Elizabeth) in 1996 as the Head of the Department of Public Law, a position I retained until 2013 when I took up the position of incumbent of the South African Research Chairs Initiative’s Chair in the Law of the Sea and Development in Africa.

What are your main research interests?
My main research interest is the international law of the sea as it applies in the African maritime domain together with the domestic law of Africa’s 39 coastal States. This necessitates focusing on a range of issues such as maritime security and integrity, the contribution of marine spatial planning in redressing the injustices of the past at the national and international levels and the role of disadvantaged individuals and communities in ocean governance.

How does your research have influence beyond the academic world? Does this include any roles you have beyond the academy?
My research has an impact on ocean governance in the African maritime domain in that it expounds or assists in expounding among African ocean stakeholders a field of the law until now comparatively little researched in many African States. In addition, I lead the expert body assisting the South African government in capacity-building efforts in marine protection services and ocean governance.

Is teaching still a significant part of your working life? What particular method or approach would you say characterises your teaching?
My position as the incumbent of a research chair limits the extent of my teaching. When I have the opportunity to do so, I strive to demystify what is a very complex area of the law by adapting to the individuals I am interacting with and making the engagement process as enjoyable as possible.

What specific passions or concerns particularly inspire you in your work?
I am passionate about the opportunities that sound ocean governance of the African maritime domain will create for the section of humankind who lives on the African continent. At the same time, I am concerned by the negative effects on the whole of humankind of substantive inequalities with regard to the political, social, economic and cultural opportunities that the oceans offer.

Which of your publications would you regard as the most significant and why?
One of my publications that I regard as the most significant is my book on South Africa and the Law of the Sea, published in 2011. This is because it brought South Africa into the small circle of States with regard to which such a work exists and laid a firm foundation for the further development of the field in South Africa. I am presently leading a six-volume book project on The Law of the Sea: Contemporary Norms and Practice in Africa, that builds on The Law of the Sea – The African Union and its Member States, published in 2017.

What are you particularly hoping to achieve during your time as a Visiting Professor in Gothenburg?
I am hoping to further the exchange of ideas, strengthen important strategic research areas and create possibilities for improved and deepened cooperation in the field of ocean governance between the Institute of Coastal and Marine Research at Nelson Mandela University, together with its partners, and the School of Business Economics and Law at the University of Gothenburg, together with its own partners.

Links
https://lawofthesea.mandela.ac.za

Contact
Would you like to meet Patrick and/or have an idea for future cooperation?
Send an email to his contact person at the School: Lena Gipperth
Or visit his home university website!

Focus areas:

  • African maritime domain
  • law of the sea
  • ocean governance
  • substantive equality

Visiting Professor of Public Law from Allard School of Law, University of British Columbia, Canada

Professional biography
Margot Young is Professor in the Allard School of Law at the University of British Columbia. After studying at the University of British Columbia, the University of Toronto, and the University of California, Berkeley, Professor Young began her teaching career at the Faculty of Law at the University of Victoria. In 2002, she moved to the University of British Columbia at what is now the Allard School of Law.

Professor Young teaches in the areas of constitutional and social justice law. She was the Director of the Social Justice Specialization at the law school and has organized the Law and Society Speakers Series for close to a decade. Professor Young served three terms as Chair of the university-wide Faculty Association Status of Women Committee. She is a research associate with Green College, the Peter Wall Institute of Advanced Studies, and the Centre for Gender, Race, Sexuality and Social Justice at UBC.

Professor Young’s research interests focus on equality law and theory, women’s economic equality, urban theory, and local housing politics and rights. She is also working on the intersections between environmental justice, social justice, feminism, and human rights. Professor Young was co-editor of the collection Poverty: Rights, Social Citizenship and Legal Activism and was Co-Principal Investigator of the Housing Justice Project (HousingJustice.ca). She is widely published in a variety of journals and edited books.

Professor Young is a member of the editorial boards of the Canadian Journal of Women and Law, the Review of Constitutional StudiesStudies in Housing Law and is on the advisory board of the Windsor Yearbook of Access to Justice. From 2016-2019, she was co-editor of the Law and Society Review.

Professor Young is active in a variety of professional and community organizations. She sits on the board of Justice for Girls and is Chair of the Board of Directors of the David Suzuki Foundation, a prominent national environmental organization. She is Research Associate with the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives-BC Office. Professor Young has worked with provincial and national women’s equality groups during United Nation committees’ periodic reviews of Canada’s human rights record, travelling as an NGO representative to these meetings in New York and Geneva. More specifically, she works with the BC CEDAW Group and the Feminist Alliance for International Action.

Professor Young is a frequent commentator in the media on a variety of issues to do with social justice and socio-economic rights issues. Interviews include local, national, and international print, television, and radio coverage of key constitutional, equality, and civil liberties issues. She has testified before Parliamentary committees and is active with a number of civil society groups advocating, both politically and legally, for social justice.

Select publications are listed on the Library Faculty Research Publications Database.
http://facultypubs.library.ubc.ca/index.php?bid=6&auth=147

Contact
Would you like to meet Margot and/or have an idea for future cooperation?
Send an email to her contact person at the School: Sara Stendahl
Or visit her home university website!

Focus areas:

  • equality law and theory
  • women’s economic equality
  • urban theory
  • local housing politics and rights

Funded by AB Volvo, Elanders AB, Stena AB and Richard C. Malmsten Memorial Foundation

Visiting Professor of African Business History from University of Bristol, UK

"We cannot address the big questions without understanding their historical dimension."

Professional biography
I am professor of strategy and history at the University of Bristol School of Management. Previously I worked at Aston Business School and the University of Liverpool Management School. I am currently joint editor-in-chief for Business History and serve on the editorial board of Organization Studies and on the council of the British Academy of Management.

What are your main research interests?
As a historian working at a management school, most of my work is concerned with the connection between the social sciences and history, specifically organization studies and history. I am interested in how to theorise from historical research and in developing archival and historical methods for organization studies. My historical research focuses on the history of organizations, entrepreneurs and the wider political economy in sub-Saharan Africa.

How does your research have influence beyond the academic world? Does this include any roles you have beyond the academy?
I have presented my research on African history at external organizations such as the World Bank, and work closely with heritage professionals in multinational businesses that maintain archives, members of the Business Archives Council, and specialists at The National Archives, UK. I did some media work to raise awareness that the Thomas Cook archives were in danger of being lost in 2019, and was delighted to be representing the academic community on the committee that determined where the records are now deposited.

Is teaching still a significant part of your working life? What particular method or approach would you say characterises your teaching?
Yes after a period of management responsibilities I am back in the classroom and enjoy it more than most meetings I attended! I like teaching case method which I learned at Harvard Business School, where I was the Harvard-Newcomen Fellow in Business History (2006-2007).

What specific passions or concerns particularly inspire you in your work?
I am keen not to reduce questions or problems to academic concerns that disregard context and lived experience – both in my historical and contemporary research. As more and more historians work in management and business schools, research interests have broadened to include how the past (and history) matters to organizations in the present. I see this as particularly important in areas of the world that have been historically disenfranchised, like sub-Saharan Africa.

Which of your publications would you regard as the most significant and why?
My co-authored piece on ‘Research Strategies in Organizational History’ (with Michael Rowlinson and John Hassard, Academy of Management Review, 2014) has certainly been the most influential, but this collaboration was the result of a single-authored article, ‘Silence of the Archives’ (2013), which was the first time I was able to articulate my thinking about historical methods and what it means to do research in an archive.

What are you particularly hoping to achieve during your time as a Visiting Professor in Gothenburg?
I am keen to promote more work in African business history by collaborating with my hosts in Gothenburg and by making connections between my historical research on business in Africa and work that brings more historical research into management. Management and business research in Africa is similarly underdeveloped - and to appreciate social and economic developments on the continent we need to be more aware of its unique historical trajectory.

Links
https://research-information.bris.ac.uk/en/persons/stephanie-decker(b4bae6b2-a71a-46cc-8e03-9c3ae9c3b008).html

Contact
Would you like to meet Stephanie and/or have an idea for future cooperation?
Send an email to her contact person at the School: Klas Rönnbäck
Or visit her home university website!

Focus areas:

  • Business history of sub-Saharan Africa
  • Historical methods in management & organization studies
  • Born-digital historical sources and computer-assisted qualitative data analysis
  • Sustainability and bottom-of-pyramid business models in sub-Saharan African

Visiting Professor of Law from the University of New South Wales (UNSW Sydney), Australia

"Digital technology is remaking global legal relations in ways still not well understood."

Professional biography
I am Professor in the Faculty of Law at UNSW Sydney, Australia. Before joining UNSW, I was Co-Director of the Sydney Centre for International Law at the University of Sydney and I have also held visiting appointments in Canada (the University of Toronto), the UK (the LSE), and the US (the Institute for Advanced Study). I currently serve on editorial boards in the US, the UK and Australia, including that of the American Journal of International Law. My publications include the following books: The Mekong: A Socio-legal Approach to River Basin Development (Routledge, 2015, with co-authors Boer, Hirsch, Saul & Scurrah); Non-Legality in International Law: Unruly Law (Cambridge, 2013); Events: The Force of International Law (Routledge, 2011, with co-editors Joyce & Pahuja); and International Legal Personality (Ashgate, 2010). I am a graduate of Melbourne University (BA, LLB(Hons)) and Harvard University (LLM, SJD; Menzies Scholar; Laylin Prize).

What are your main research interests?
Working in the fields of international law and legal theory, broadly understood, I study emergent patterns of governance on the global plane, and their social, political and economic implications, employing an interdisciplinary approach that draws on the social sciences and humanities and combines the study of public and private law. In recent years, my work has focused on the role of automation and digital technology in global legal relations, especially in development, humanitarian aid and disaster relief. I am currently leading an Australian Research Council-funded project, in collaboration with a computer science colleague, entitled 'Data Science in Humanitarianism: Confronting Novel Law and Policy Challenges': see here for details.

How does your research have influence beyond the academic world? Does this include any roles you have beyond the academy?
Broader societal influences of the kind of work that I do are difficult to trace. Nonetheless, feedback indicates that my research has been influential in a range of settings. For example, my 2015 co-authored book was the subject of two public forums in Thailand at which politicians, activists, journalists and policy-makers engaged extensively with the book’s arguments – engagement that has continued sporadically since. The impact my research is also apparent from its citation in a range of settings, e.g., before the U.N. Sub-Commission on Prevention of Discrimination and Protection of Minorities and in parliamentary digests prepared to inform legislative debate in the Australian Federal Parliament. I have served on several not-for-profit community organizations’ boards, have fairly regularly made submissions to parliamentary inquiries and public hearings on law reform issues in Australia, and I have also been part of a collaborative effort to build and sustain a unique, multi-lingual platform for cross-sectoral idea exchange and generation, headquartered at Northwestern University in the US: Meridian 180.

Is teaching still a significant part of your working life? What particular method or approach would you say characterises your teaching?
Teaching and PhD supervision are still very important parts of my working life (barring a recent stint away from teaching while I served in an Associate Dean role). I teach in a way that is interactive and as responsive to student interests and experiences as possible. I try to help students to learn reflexively, to test their working assumptions and intuitions, open these to counter-arguments and very different points of view, and thereby both strengthen their skills and sustain their passions.

What specific passions or concerns particularly inspire you in your work?
A concern with distributive inequity; openness to the unfamiliar, the banal and the marginal; a fascination with patterns and their making and remaking; attention to technique: these have long characterised my research. Far from doubling down in one or two specific areas, I have consistently pursued lines of inquiry that yolk together a number of sub-specialties or defy disciplinary bounds. My work has sought to remake understandings of international law not so much in a masterful, root-and-branch way as by tunneling within the discipline, elucidating faint or emergent patterns.

Which of your publications would you regard as the most significant and why?
My 2013 book, Non-legality in International Law: Unruly Law (Cambridge University Press), demonstrated how international lawyers craft understandings of the world and how law shapes conduct beyond the law. It showed that modes of juridical action and thought in fields typically treated as beyond the range of primary legal concern – for example, practices deemed illicit, informal or ‘merely’ technical – have tremendously under-recognised normative significance.

What are you particularly hoping to achieve during your time as a Visiting Professor in Gothenburg?
My hope is to be able to contribute meaningfully to the work already underway at the University of Gothenburg on the significance of digitalisation and artificial intelligence for legal responsibility and legal relations, and the role of law in shaping technological development in these areas. I hope to build some productive new collaborations with colleagues and learn from researchers and research students engaged in work on these themes.  This will, I hope, aid my own work on a forthcoming book - #Help: The Digital Transformation of Humanitarianism and the Future of Global Order - and related projects in the works.

Links
https://www.law.unsw.edu.au/staff/fleur-johns
https://research.unsw.edu.au/people/professor-fleur-johns
https://twitter.com/FleurEJ

Contact
Would you like to meet Fleur and/or have an idea for future cooperation?
Send an email to her contact person at the School: Gregor Noll
Or visit her home university website!

Focus areas:

  • International law
  • International legal theory
  • Law, society and technology
  • Global inequalities