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Petra Boström

Senior Lecturer

Department of
Psychology
Telephone
Visiting address
Haraldsgatan 1
41314 Göteborg
Room number
428
Postal address
Box 500
40530 Göteborg

About Petra Boström

Biography

Since 2005 I have been working with research and lecturing at the Department of Psychology. I have a Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of Gothenburg. I did my undergradutate studies at the Queen’s University of Belfast as well as a few years of studies at the University of Gothenburg in Conflict Management and Social Anthropology.

Teaching

I teach and supervise mainly in qualitative methods and developmental psychology.

Research interests

Children with intellectual disability are seldom included in large-scale surveys of mental health. Together with Malin Broberg and Jakob Åsberg I am working on developing new methods to assess mental health in children in special education classes (särskola). I am particularly interested in the interactions between mental health, peer-relations, family context and school climate. Another focus of my research is on parenthood and the special circumstances of parenting a child with an intellectual disability.  

Current research

Presently I am working on developing new methods to assess mental health in children in special education classes and to assess the state of mental health in pupils aged 12-15.

Selected publications

Boström, P. K., Broberg, M., & Bodin, L. (2011). Child's positive and negative impacts on parents - A person-oriented approach to understanding temperament in preschool children with intellectual disabilities. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 32(5), 1860-1871.

Boström, P., Broberg, M., & Hwang, C. P. (2010). Different, difficult or distinct? mothers' and fathers' perceptions of temperament in children with and without intellectual disabilities. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 54(9), 806-819.

Boström, P. K., Broberg, M., & Hwang, P. (2010). Parents' descriptions and experiences of young children recently diagnosed with intellectual disability. Child Care, Health & Development, 36(1), 93-100.