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Members of the research group
Photo: GU
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Ageing and wellbeing in low- and middle-income countries

Research project
Pågående forskning
Project size
5.2M SEK for research in Myanmar. Research in the other arms are not funded yet.
Project period
2018 - 2024
Project owner
Institute of Medicine, School of Public Health and Community Medicine

Short description

The world population is ageing. It is estimated that by the year 2050, two billion people will be 60+ years of age: 61 percent of whom live in Asia. The research in this stream intends to shed light on what factors are associated with healthy ageing, defined as freedom from illness, disability, and dependency and a connectedness with society which can be called “active ageing”. This stream further explores health inequalities which persist among the ageing.

Most of the research is conducted together with doctoral students and master’s students in the Master’s of Global Health and Master’s of Public Health programs at the University of Gothenburg, and Master of Public Health at Lund University.

Background

The world population is ageing. It is estimated that by the year 2050, two billion people will be 60+ years of age: 61 percent of whom live in Asia. The research in this stream intends to shed light on what factors are associated with healthy ageing, defined as freedom from illness, disability, and dependency and a connectedness with society which can be called “active ageing”.  This stream further explores health inequalities which persist among the ageing.

Most studies on ageing and older populations have been conducted in high-income countries in the last few decades, for example, the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE), the US Health and Retirement Survey (HRS), and the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA). To address the research gaps on population ageing in LMICs where data on older people’s health and wellbeing is scarce, the World Health Organization initiated the Study on global ageing and adult health (WHO SAGE) in 2007 in six LMICs, including China, Ghana, India, Mexico, the Russian Federation and South Africa. Since then, several other longitudinal studies on ageing have flourished in low- and middle-income countries, including the Costa Rican Longevity and Healthy Aging Study (CRELES), the Korean Longitudinal Study of Aging (KLoSA), the Longitudinal Aging Study in India (LASI), and the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS).

Most of the research in this research stream utilize the longitudinal data on ageing described, and are conducted together with the doctoral students and the master students at the University of Gothenburg and at Lund University. 

Student participants and PhD projects

1. Godfrey Yanfei Guo, GU and Centre for Disease Control Shanghai, China: Frailty in an older population in China: Trajectories, determinants, and impacts on health care utilisation and mortality.

2. Khin Thiri Maung, GU and HelpAge International Myanmar: Inequalities in health care utilization among older people in Myanmar.

3. Nguyen Thi Ngoc Phuong, GU and Hanoi University of Public Health, Vietnam: Tobacco control policies in Vietnam: Evaluation and stakeholder perceptions.

4. Royasia Viki Ramadani, GU and Universitas Indonesia: Towards a better understanding of the future of long-term care in Indonesia - Estimation of current and future burden related to cardiovascular diseases.

5. Xiaowei Dong, GU and Nanjing Shuangke Medicine Development, China: Social transition and depression in China: The impact of family structure and unemployment in mid-to-late life.

6. Septi Kurnia Lestari, Umeå University and Universitas Gadjah Mada, Indonesia: The role of social relationship on healthy ageing among European population.

Batch 2018-2020

  • Alexandra Baxter, Master’s Programme in Public Health, Lund University
  • Ebtisam Egal, Master’s Programme in Public Health, University of Gothenburg
  • Meron Mekonnen, Master’s Programme in Public Health, University of Gothenburg
  • Said Ammar, Master’s Programme in Global Health, University of Gothenburg
  • Tafirenyika Gwenzi, Master’s Programme in Global Health, University of Gothenburg
  • Tarishi Sharma, Master’s Programme in Public Health, University of Gothenburg
  • William Son Galanza, Master’s Programme in Global Health, University of Gothenburg

Publications

Find and read the theses via Gothenburg University Library.

  • Alexandra Baxter (2020) Analysing Sleep Quantity and Quality as Mediators in the Association between Self- Reported Diabetes Mellitus and Depression and Anxiety in a Population Aged 50 Years and Over: A Cross-Sectional Study Based on the Study on Global Ageing and Adult Health (SAGE). Thesis for Master in Public Health. Lund: Lund University.
  • Ebtisam Egal (2020) Cognitive impairment amongst older adults: The impact of social isolation and loneliness in low and middle-income countries. Thesis for Master in Public Health. Gothenburg: University of Gothenburg.
  • Said Ammar (2020) The association between obesity and mental health among older people in China: The mediating role of social capital. Thesis for Master in Global Health. Gothenburg: University of Gothenburg.
  • Tafirenyika Gwenzi (2020) Investigating the association between social capital and cancer screening among older people in Costa Rica: An exploratory analysis. Thesis for Master in Global Health. Gothenburg: University of Gothenburg.
  • Tarishi Sharma (2020) The association between socioeconomic status and smoking and alcohol consumption among older people in China: The role of family support as a modifier. Thesis for Master in Public Health. Gothenburg: University of Gothenburg.
  • William Son Galanza (2020) The impact of social capital on the cognitive function among older people in China. Thesis for Master in Global Health. Gothenburg: University of Gothenburg.

Meron Mekonnen (2020) Psychosocial risk factors and late-life depression: The case of Sweden. Thesis in progress.