Skip to main content
Breadcrumb

Jon Pierre, Professor

Jon is Professor of political science. His research is about governance, or how local or national political systems are controlled and coordinated, as well as public administration policy and public management. Jon is teaching at the Master’s level in political science.

 

Image
Jon Pierre
Jon Piere
Photo: Johan Wingborg

Can you describe your research?

‘I study governance a lot, or how local or national political systems are controlled and coordinated, as well as public administration policy and public management. I have also studied and written about urban politics for a long time. One of these areas interests me, one gives me fantastic colleagues and the third I just happened to slip into.’

What makes your research interesting?

‘Public administration policy concerns how we organise the exercise of public power and how we design the link between the state and its citizens. This makes public administration policy an issue of central interest in political science. The governance research and urban politics look at the same issues from a collective-action perspective and ask how we can govern our societies. It doesn’t get any more interesting than that, although it can still be difficult to explain to people who are not into it.’

What do you teach?

‘This semester, I teach public administration policy in the undergraduate programme and the Master’s programme. I also teach political governance and professional autonomy in the teacher education programmes, and at IAGG about how economic globalisation has spurred changes in state policies and institutions.’

Why did you get into political science?

‘My first intention was to study another social science, but I accidently walked into the wrong classroom and ended up at the introductory meeting for political science at Lund University. It sounded much more interesting than what I had signed up for, so I managed to change my major so I could study political science.’

When is your job the most enjoyable?

‘It’s an amazing feeling to experience the passion of students, PhD candidates and postdocs who are not here for career reasons but because they are genuinely interested in how collective action can be organised. It is also liberating to hang out with the administrative staff, who see straight though the academic posturing. We have an incredibly dynamic and creative research environment that it is a privilege to be part of.’

If you hadn’t become a political scientist, what would you be doing today?

‘I would probably be a journalist.’