Till sidans topp

Sidansvarig: Webbredaktion
Sidan uppdaterades: 2012-09-11 15:12

Tipsa en vän
Utskriftsversion

Communicative challenges … - Göteborgs universitet Till startsida
Webbkarta
Till innehåll Läs mer om hur kakor används på gu.se

Communicative challenges among physicians, patients, and family caregivers in cancer care: An exploratory qualitative study in Ethiopia

Artikel i vetenskaplig tidskrift
Författare Betlehem Girma Kebede
Aynalem Abraha
Rune Andersson
Christian Munthe
Mats Linderholm
Barbro Linderholm
Nataliya Berbyuk Lindström
Publicerad i PLoS ONE
Volym 15
Nummer/häfte 3
ISSN 1932-6203
Publiceringsår 2020
Publicerad vid Institutionen för kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för onkologi
Institutionen för tillämpad informationsteknologi (GU)
Institutionen för filosofi, lingvistik och vetenskapsteori
Institutionen för biomedicin, avdelningen för infektionssjukdomar
Språk en
Länkar https://doi.org/ https://doi.org/10...
https://journals.plos.org/plosone/a...
https://gup.ub.gu.se/file/208077
Ämnesord cancer, oncology, bioethics, health communication, global health, Africa, Ethiopia, family
Ämneskategorier Praktisk filosofi, Etik, Lingvistik, Cancer och onkologi, Hälso- och sjukvårdsorganisation, hälsopolitik och hälsoekonomi, Folkhälsovetenskap, global hälsa, socialmedicin och epidemiologi, Omvårdnad, Medicinsk etik, Palliativ medicin, Tvärvetenskapliga studier

Sammanfattning

Background: Cancer is a growing concern in Ethiopia. Though communication is essential for the treatment process, few studies have looked at communication in Ethiopian cancer care. Due to the large number of patients and scarcity of resources, it is vital to understand how to manage consultations in order to effectively help as many patients as possible in this challenging work environment. Thus, research is needed to analyze and understand the communicative challenges experienced by physicians, patients, and family caregivers, in order to successfully handle patient care in practice. Objective We explore communication in Ethiopian cancer care and present the main challenges faced by physicians, patients, and family caregivers. Methods This explorative qualitative study was conducted at the Oncology Department of the Tikur Anbessa (Black Lion) Specialized Teaching Hospital (TASH) in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. A triangulation of data collection methods was used: 91 audio-recorded, semi-structured interviews and 21 video-recordings of authentic interactions during hospital rounds. The aim was to obtain as complete a picture as possible of communication from the perspectives of physicians, patients, and family caregivers. The interviews were analyzed using thematic content analysis and the identified themes were supported by excerpts from the transcribed recordings. Results Eight themes emerged from the data. Workload and time pressure, in combination with restricted space for privacy, limited the possibilities for physicians to deliver detailed information and provide emotional support. Furthermore, patient literacy levels, in combination with no or little cancer awareness, financial problems, reliance on traditional and religious treatments, the stigma of cancer, and a fatalistic attitude, resulted in delays in patients seeking care and participating in positive health behaviors, and, subsequently, often resulted in an unwillingness to openly discuss problems with physicians and adhere to treatment. The study also illustrates the paramount role of family in physician-patient communication in Ethiopia. Though family caregivers provide a valuable interpreting support when patients have limited language skills, they can also prevent patients from sharing information with physicians. Another important finding is that family caregivers were often responsible for making decisions about treatment and avoided telling patients about a poor prognosis, believing that conveying bad news may upset them. All of these themes have important implications for the role of ethically acceptable communication in patient-centered care. Conclusions This study has identified a number of serious challenges for successful and ethically acceptable health communication in Ethiopian cancer care. The study contributes to our understanding of the complexity around the role of family, combined with patients’ dependency on family members for communication, support, and access to care, which creates particular ethical dilemmas for the medical staff. The questions raised by this study concern how to organize consultations to achieve patient-centered health communication, while maintaining a constructive alliance with the family and not jeopardizing the patient’s continued access to care. The integration of communication training for medical students in Ethiopia, with a focus on ethical guidelines for family-centered patient consultation suitable for these circumstances, would be an essential step.

Sidansvarig: Webbredaktion|Sidan uppdaterades: 2012-09-11
Dela:

På Göteborgs universitet använder vi kakor (cookies) för att webbplatsen ska fungera på ett bra sätt för dig. Genom att surfa vidare godkänner du att vi använder kakor.  Vad är kakor?