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Hormones and drinking behaviour: new findings on ghrelin, insulin, leptin and volume-regulating hormones. An ESBRA Symposium report.

Journal article
Authors Giovanni Addolorato
Lorenzo Leggio
Thomas Hillemacher
Thomas Kraus
Elisabeth Jerlhag
Stefan Bleich
Published in Drug and alcohol review
Volume 28
Issue 2
Pages 160-5
ISSN 1465-3362
Publication year 2009
Published at Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Department of Pharmacology
Pages 160-5
Language en
Links dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1465-3362.2008...
Keywords Alcohol Drinking, physiopathology, psychology, Alcoholism, physiopathology, psychology, rehabilitation, Animals, Appetite Regulation, physiology, Atrial Natriuretic Factor, physiology, Ghrelin, physiology, Humans, Insulin, physiology, Leptin, physiology, Motivation, Peptide Hormones, physiology, Societies, Medical, Vasopressins, physiology
Subject categories Physiology

Abstract

There is growing evidence for a role of appetite-related peptides and volume-regulating hormones in alcoholism. In particular, recent evidence has suggested that hormones, such as ghrelin, insulin and leptin and volume-regulating hormones, could play a role in alcohol-seeking behaviour. The goal of this review is to discuss the results of recent preclinical and clinical investigations on this topic. The findings indicate that neuroendocrinological mechanisms are potentially involved in the neurobiology of alcohol craving. Accordingly, research on this topic could lead to possible development of new therapeutic approaches in the treatment of patients with alcohol problems.

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