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High levels in serum, but no signs of intrathecal synthesis of anti-sulfatide antibodies in HIV-1 infected individuals with or without central nervous system complications

Journal article
Authors Magnus Gisslén
Annika Lekman
Pam Fredman
Published in J Neuroimmunol
Volume 94
Issue 1-2
Pages 153-6
Publication year 1999
Published at Institute of Internal Medicine, Dept of Infectious Diseases
Institute of Clinical Neurosciences, Section of Experimental Neuroscience
Pages 153-6
Language en
Links www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.f...
Keywords AIDS Dementia Complex/blood/cerebrospinal fluid/*immunology, Adult, Autoantibodies/blood/cerebrospinal fluid, HIV-1/*immunology, Humans, Immunoglobulin G/blood/cerebrospinal fluid, Middle Aged, Myelin Sheath/chemistry/immunology/virology, Sulfoglycosphingolipids/cerebrospinal fluid/*immunology
Subject categories Microbiology in the medical area

Abstract

Myelin degeneration is commonly found in the central nervous system (CNS) of individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), especially in patients with HIV-1-associated dementia. We analysed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum samples from 25 HIV-1 infected individuals for the presence of antibodies directed against sulfatide, the major acidic glycosphingolipid in myelin. Nine of the patients had CNS complications, including 3 with HIV-1-associated dementia, and 16 had no neurological symptoms. Elevated titres of anti-sulfatide antibodies were found in serum from 24/25 HIV-1-infected individuals but in none of them in the CSF. Although the vast majority of HIV-1-infected individuals harbour autoantibodies directed against sulfatide in serum, the lack of detectable intrathecal production indicates that anti-sulfatide antibodies are not a major component in the pathogenesis of CNS myelin damage in HIV-1 infection.

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