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Changes in reported orofacial symptoms over a ten-year period as reflected in two cohorts of fifty-year-old subjects

Journal article
Authors Lennart Unell
Anders Johansson
Gunnar E Carlsson
Arne Halling
Björn Söderfeldt
Published in Acta Odontol Scand
Volume 64
Pages 202-208
Publication year 2006
Published at Institute of Odontology
Pages 202-208
Language en
Keywords Bruxism, epidemiology, orofacial pain, questionnaire, temporomandibular disorders
Subject categories Other odontology

Abstract

Objectives. The study presents changes in reported orofacial symptoms during 10 years. It was hypothesized that there was an increase of TMD and orofacial pain symptoms during the period concurrent with social and demographic changes. Material and methods. All 50-year-old subjects living in two Swedish counties were asked to answer a mail questionnaire in 1992 and 2002. In the two cohorts, 6343 and 5798, respectively, responded (response rate 71.3 % and 70.2 %). Results. Striking differences in demographic, occupational, general and oral health conditions were found. General health was reported to be less good, utilization of dental care decreased, whereas number of teeth increased. The prevalence of a number of intraoral symptoms and orofacial symptoms increased significantly between 1992 and 2002. Reported bruxism increased from 18 % in 1992 to 28 % in 2002. Conclusions. The observed increase of reported orofacial pain symptoms during the 10-year period, concurrent with changes in society, deserves further attention by society and the dental community.

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