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Clinical experiences with laser-welded titanium frameworks supported by implants in the edentulous mandible: a 10-year follow-up study.

Journal article
Authors Anders Örtorp
Torsten Jemt
Published in Clinical implant dentistry and related research
Volume 8
Issue 4
Pages 198-209
ISSN 1523-0899
Publication year 2006
Published at Institute of Odontology
Pages 198-209
Language en
Links dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1708-8208.2006...
Keywords Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Alveolar Bone Loss, etiology, Dental Implantation, Endosseous, adverse effects, Dental Implants, adverse effects, Dental Prosthesis Design, Dental Prosthesis, Implant-Supported, Dental Restoration Failure, Dental Soldering, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Gold Alloys, Humans, Jaw, Edentulous, rehabilitation, Lasers, Life Tables, Male, Mandible, Middle Aged, Retrospective Studies, Titanium, Welding
Subject categories Dentistry, Biomaterials, Surgical research, Oral prosthetics

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Long-term follow-up studies for more than 5 years are not available on laser-welded titanium frameworks. PURPOSE: To report and compare 10-year data on implant-supported prostheses in the edentulous mandible provided with laser-welded titanium frameworks and conventional gold alloy frameworks. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Altogether, 155 patients were consecutively treated with prostheses at abutment level with two generations of fixed laser-welded titanium frameworks (test groups). A control group of 53 randomly selected patients with conventional gold alloy castings was used for comparison. Clinical and radiographic 10-year data were collected for the three groups. RESULTS: All patients followed-up for 10 years (n=112) still had fixed prostheses in the mandible (cumulative success rate [CSR] 100%). The overall 10-year cumulative success rate (CSR) was 92.8 and 100.0% for titanium and gold alloy frameworks, respectively. Ten-year implant cumulative survival rate (CSR) was 99.4 and 99.6% for the test and control groups, respectively. Average 10-year bone loss was 0.56 (SD 0.45) mm for the titanium group and 0.77 (SD 0.36) mm for the control group (p < 0.05). The most common complications for titanium frameworks were resin or veneer fractures, soft tissue inflammation, and fractures (12.9%) of the metal frame. Loose and fractured implant screw components were below 3%. CONCLUSION: Excellent overall long-term results with 100% CSR could be achieved with the present treatment modality. Fractures of the metal frames and remade prostheses were more common for the laser-welded titanium frameworks, and the first generation of titanium frameworks worked poorly when compared with gold alloy frameworks during 10 years (p < 0.05). However, on average more bone loss was observed for implants supporting gold alloy frameworks during 10 years. The reasons for this difference are not clear.

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