To the top

Page Manager: Webmaster
Last update: 9/11/2012 3:13 PM

Tell a friend about this page
Print version

Evolution of the urban ae… - University of Gothenburg, Sweden Till startsida
Sitemap
To content Read more about how we use cookies on gu.se

Evolution of the urban aerosol during winter temperature inversion episodes

Journal article
Authors Sara Janhäll
K. Frans G. Olofson
Patrik U Andersson
Jan B. C. Pettersson
Mattias Hallquist
Published in Atmospheric Environment
Volume 40
Issue 28
Pages 5355-5366
Publication year 2006
Published at Department of Chemistry
Pages 5355-5366
Language en
Links <Go to ISI>://000240790900003
Keywords winter inversion, submicrometer particles, traffic, urban atmosphere, LIDAR, PARTICLE-SIZE DISTRIBUTION, TRAFFIC EMISSION FACTORS, ULTRAFINE, PARTICLES, AIR-POLLUTION, NUMBER CONCENTRATIONS, ROADSIDE ATMOSPHERE, FINE PARTICLES, BOUNDARY-LAYER, STREET CANYON, COASTAL AREA
Subject categories Chemical Sciences

Abstract

Winter temperature inversions are for Nordic urban sites a major cause for exceeding air-quality legislation thresholds for most primary pollutants. In this study, number particle size distributions have been measured and compared to other tracers for traffic emissions. Concentrations during winter days with and without morning temperature inversion were compared. Morning temperature inversion resulted in high concentrations of traffic-related pollutants, including CO, NO and NO2 together with ultrafine particles, while the pollution levels where considerably lower during mornings without temperature inversion. The specific time trends of NOx species could be well understood when considering the reaction with O-3. The two different particle measures used in this study, i.e. the number concentration of ultrafine particles (10-100 nm) and the mass of particles below 10 pm (PM10), both increased during morning rush hours. When the morning inversion broke up and ground-level air mixed with air aloft, the number of particles decreased more rapidly than PM10 concentrations. LIDAR measurements were used to follow the vertical distribution of particles, and they clearly showed how the mixing processes started after the morning inversion and resulted in rising of the inversion followed by a relatively well-mixed boundary layer with a height of I kin around 14:00. (c) 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Page Manager: Webmaster|Last update: 9/11/2012
Share:

The University of Gothenburg uses cookies to provide you with the best possible user experience. By continuing on this website, you approve of our use of cookies.  What are cookies?