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Correspondence Between the Neuropsychiatric Interview M.I.N.I. and the BDI-II and MADRS-S Self-Rating Instruments as Diagnostic Tools in Primary Care Patients with Depression

Journal article
Authors Shabnam Nejati
Nashmil Ariai
Cecilia Björkelund
Ingmarie Skoglund
Eva-Lisa Petersson
P. Augustsson
Dominique Hange
Irene Svenningsson
Published in International Journal of General Medicine
Volume 13
Pages 177-183
ISSN 1178-7074
Publication year 2020
Published at Institute of Medicine, School of Public Health and Community Medicine
Pages 177-183
Language en
Links dx.doi.org/10.2147/ijgm.S243150
Keywords depression, diagnostic instrument, primary care, self-assessment, instrument, dsm-iv, scale, inventory, anxiety, prevalence, version, mini, General & Internal Medicine
Subject categories Family Medicine

Abstract

Objective: To investigate the correspondence between the diagnoses received by patients with symptoms of common mental disorder attending primary care, based on the diagnostic instrument International Neuropsychiatric Interview (M.I.N.I.) and the self-assessment instruments such as Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale - self-rating version (MADRS-S), respectively. Design: Data were collected from a prospective observational study, ADAS, between 2014 and 2015. Setting: Twenty-eight primary care centers in Region Vastra Gotaland, Sweden. Patients: A total of 192 patients, 18-60 years of age, on sick leave >= 14 days, with mild/moderate depression, anxiety syndrome, and stress-related mental illness were included. Main Outcome Measures: Scores of the assessment instruments (BDI-II and MADRS-S) on inclusion, sensitivity, specificity, positive (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) for BDI-II and MADRS-S, respectively, with M.I.N.I used as diagnostic instrument. Results: Using M.I.N.I. as gold standard, the BDI-II and MADRS-S showed almost the same sensitivity (86.9% and 87.4%, respectively), but specificity for MADRS-S was doubled compared to BDI-II (36% and 18%, respectively). There was a significant association between MADRS-S and M.I.N.I. (p=0.027). However, the same analysis between BDI and M.I.N.I. was not statistically significant (p=0.635). NPV and PPV were calculated from assumed prevalences (10% and 75%) and were higher for MADRS-S compared to BDI-II. The PPV differences were between 2% and 7% and NPV differences were between 3% and 19%. Conclusion: With M.I.N.I. as gold standard, MADRS-S performs better than BDI-II as a self-assessment tool in the primary care context for depression diagnostics.

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