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Impact of a person-centred group intervention on life satisfaction and engagement in activities among persons aging in the context of migration

Journal article
Authors Lea Annikki Arola
Synneve Dahlin-Ivanoff
Greta Häggblom Kronlöf
Published in Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy
Volume 27
Issue 4
Pages 269-279
ISSN 1103-8128
Publication year 2020
Published at Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Department of Health and Rehabilitation
University of Gothenburg Centre for person-centred care (GPCC)
Centre for Ageing and Health (Agecap)
Pages 269-279
Language en
Links https://doi.org/10.1080/11038128.20...
Keywords Capability, health promotion, interdisciplinary, leisure interest, migration old age, peer-learning, wellbeing
Subject categories Occupational Therapy

Abstract

Background: There is a growing need to support the health and wellbeing of older persons aging in the context of migration. Objectives: We evaluated whether a group-based health promotion program with person-centred approach, maintained or improved life satisfaction and engagement in activities of older immigrants in Sweden. Methods: A randomised controlled trial with post-intervention follow-ups at 6 months and 1 year was conducted with 131 older independently living persons aged ≥70 years from Finland and the Balkan Peninsula. Participants were randomly allocated to an intervention group (4 weeks of group intervention and a follow-up home visit) and a control group (no intervention). Outcome measures were life satisfaction and engagement in activities. Chi-square and odds ratios were calculated. Results: The odds ratios for maintenance or improvement of life satisfaction (for social contact and psychological health) were higher in the person-centred intervention group. More participants in the intervention group maintained or improved their general participation in activities compared with the control group. However, no significant between-group differences were found. Conclusion: Person-centred interventions can support older person’s capability to maintain their health in daily life when aging in migration. Further research is needed with a larger sample and longer intervention period to determine the effectiveness of the intervention.

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