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A new Swedish reference for total and prepubertal height.

Journal article
Authors Kerstin Albertsson-Wikland
Aimon Niklasson
Anton Holmgren
Lars Gelander
Andreas F M Nierop
Published in Acta paediatrica (Oslo, Norway : 1992)
ISSN 1651-2227
Publication year 2019
Published at Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Department of Physiology
Institute of Clinical Sciences, Department of Pediatrics
Language en
Links dx.doi.org/10.1111/apa.15129
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.f...
Subject categories Pediatrics

Abstract

We aimed to develop up-to-date references with standard deviation scores (SDS) for prepubertal and total height.Longitudinal length/height measures from 1572 healthy children (51.5% boys) born at term in 1989-1991 to non-smoking mothers and Nordic parents were obtained from the GrowUp 1990 Gothenburg cohort. A total height SDS reference from birth to adult height was constructed from Quadratic-Exponential-Pubertal-Stop (QEPS) function estimated heights based on individual growth curves. A prepubertal height SDS reference, showing growth trajectory in the absence of puberty, was constructed using the QE functions.The total height reference showed taller prepubertal mean heights (for boys 1-2cm; for girls 0.5-1.0cm) with a narrower normal within ±2SDS range versus the GrowUp 1974 Gothenburg reference. Adult height was increased by +0.9cm for females (168.6cm) and by +1.6cm for males (182.0cm). Height in children growing at -2SDS (the cutoff used for referrals) differed up to 2cm versus the GrowUp 1974 Gothenburg reference, 3cm versus Swedish 1981 references and World Health Organization (WHO) 0-5 years standard, and 6-8cm versus the WHO 5-19 years reference.Up-to-date total and prepubertal height references offer promise of improved growth monitoring compared with the references used in Sweden today.

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