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The Many Faces of School Violence: Ambivalent Categorizations of Perpetrators and Victims.

Chapter in book
Authors Johannes Lunneblad
Thomas Johansson
Published in Policing Schools: School Violence and the Juridification of Youth. Lunneblad J. (red.)
Pages 71-84
ISBN 978-3-030-18604-3
Publisher Springer
Place of publication Cham
Publication year 2019
Published at Department of Education, Communication and Learning
Pages 71-84
Language en
Links https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-1...
Subject categories Pedagogy

Abstract

During the past decades, behaviour among students in the Swedish schools once described as teasing and fighting has become part of a legal discourse. It is possible to follow a transitional process and development, during this period, in which schools have become increasingly regulated by legal rules. This transition has been defined as the juridification of schools. Consequently, acts previously understood as political, social or moral issues are now concerns requiring legal decisions and laws. In this chapter, we discuss how school officials at different schools described various measures taken to deal with school violence. The school officials mainly reported physical violence to the police. However, reporting to the police was not necessarily linked to the degree of violence inflicted on students. Furthermore, the professionals filed police reports to clearly delineate what behaviour was not tolerated. However, rather than reporting to the police, the school officials also tried to solve ‘problems’ using social pedagogical interventions.

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