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Sex differences in personality are larger in gender equal countries: Replicating and extending a surprising finding

Journal article
Authors Erik Mac Giolla
Petri Kajonius
Published in International Journal of Psychology
Volume 54
Issue 6
Pages 705-711
ISSN 0020-7594
Publication year 2019
Published at Department of Psychology
Pages 705-711
Language en
Links https://doi.org/10.1002/ijop.12529
Keywords Big five, Country comparisons, Gender equality, Personality, Sex differences
Subject categories Psychology

Abstract

Sex differences in personality have been shown to be larger in more gender equal countries. We advance this research by using an extensive personality measure, the IPIP-NEO-120, with large country samples (N > 1000), from 22 countries. Furthermore, to capture the multidimensionality of personality we measure sex differences with a multivariate effect size (Mahalanobis distance D). Results indicate that past research, using univariate measures of effect size, have underestimated the size of between-country sex differences in personality. Confirming past research, there was a strong correlation (r =.69) between a country's sex differences in personality and their Gender Equality Index. Additional analyses showed that women typically score higher than men on all five trait factors (Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness, Agreeableness and Conscientiousness), and that these relative differences are larger in more gender equal countries. We speculate that as gender equality increases both men and women gravitate towards their traditional gender roles.

Page Manager: Webmaster|Last update: 9/11/2012
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