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Bipolar disorder type I and II show distinct relationships between cortical thickness and executive function.

Journal article
Authors C Abé
Sindre Rolstad
P Petrovic
C-J Ekman
Timea Sparding
M Ingvar
Mikael Landén
Published in Acta psychiatrica Scandinavica
Volume 138
Issue 4
Pages 325-335
ISSN 1600-0447
Publication year 2018
Published at Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry
Pages 325-335
Language en
Links https://doi.org/10.1111/acps.12922
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.f...
https://gup.ub.gu.se/file/207555
Keywords bipolar disorder, bipolar subtypes, cortical thickness, executive functioning, neuroimaging
Subject categories Psychiatry, Radiology, Psychology

Abstract

Frontal cortical abnormalities and executive function impairment co-occur in bipolar disorder. Recent studies have shown that bipolar subtypes differ in the degree of structural and functional impairments. The relationships between cognitive performance and cortical integrity have not been clarified and might differ across patients with bipolar disorder type I, II, and healthy subjects.Using a vertex-wise whole-brain analysis, we investigated how cortical integrity, as measured by cortical thickness, correlates with executive performance in patients with bipolar disorder type I, II, and controls (N = 160).We found focal associations between executive function and cortical thickness in the medial prefrontal cortex in bipolar II patients and controls, but not in bipolar I disorder. In bipolar II patients, we observed additional correlations in lateral prefrontal and occipital regions.Our findings suggest that bipolar disorder patients show altered structure-function relationships, and importantly that those relationships may differ between bipolar subtypes. The findings are line with studies suggesting subtype-specific neurobiological and cognitive profiles. This study contributes to a better understanding of brain structure-function relationships in bipolar disorder and gives important insights into the neuropathophysiology of diagnostic subtypes.

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