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Subsequent infection with extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in patients with prior infection or fecal colonization

Journal article
Authors Anna Lindblom
Nahid Karami
T. Magnusson
Christina Åhrén
Published in European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases
Volume 37
Issue 8
Pages 1491-1497
ISSN 0934-9723
Publication year 2018
Published at Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Infectious Medicine
Pages 1491-1497
Language en
Links dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10096-018-3275-...
Keywords Extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL), E. coli, K. pneumoniae, Fecal screening, Urinary tract, urinary-tract-infection, blood-stream infections, 1-year follow-up, escherichia-coli, risk-factors, e. coli, bacteremia, mortality, women, metaanalysis, Infectious Diseases, Microbiology, xman b, 1990, american journal of public health, v80, p331
Subject categories Infectious Medicine

Abstract

In clinical practice, there is a growing need to assess the impact of prior colonization or infection with extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (EPE) on new EPE infections. We have investigated the frequency of, and duration to, a subsequent EPE infection in patients with prior fecal carriage or infection with EPE. Culture data for 3272 EPE-positive patients in Western Sweden during 2004-2014 were evaluated. The median follow-up time was 3.7 years. The first recorded EPE-positive fecal screen, or clinical (urine, blood) culture, and subsequent EPE-positive clinical samples were analyzed, focusing on the first and last recurrence of EPE infection. ESBL Escherichia coli dominated (95%). Almost all (94%) patients initially positive in fecal screen (n = 1436) and 72 and 71% of those initially positive in urine (n = 1717) and blood (n = 119) had no further EPE clinical isolates. Subsequent EPE bacteremia was only detected in 0.7, 1.6, and 4.2% of the respective patient group. Recurrent EPE-positive urine cultures occurred in 27% (460/1717), most (75%) within 6 months, and rarely (13%) after 1 year. Repeated EPE-positive clinical samples were significantly (p < 0.01) more common in patients > 65 years and in men with ESBL Klebsiella pneumoniae. In our low-endemic setting, subsequent EPE infections in previously colonized patients were rare. On the other hand, in patients previously EPE-positive in urine or blood, subsequent EPE urinary tract infections were common, especially within 6 months and in patients > 65 years old.

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