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Similar pattern of atrophy in early- and late-onset Alzheimer's disease

Journal article
Authors Carl Eckerström
Niklas Klasson
Erik Olsson
P. Selnes
Sindre Rolstad
Anders Wallin
Published in Alzheimer's and Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment and Disease Monitoring
Volume 10
Pages 253-259
ISSN 2352-8729
Publication year 2018
Published at Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology
Pages 253-259
Language en
Links https://doi.org/10.1016/j.dadm.2018...
Keywords Early-onset AD, Hippocampus, Late-onset AD, MRI, Neuroimaging
Subject categories Neurosciences, Neurology

Abstract

Introduction: Previous research on structural changes in early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD) and late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) have reported inconsistent findings. Methods: In the present substudy of the Gothenburg MCI study, 1.5 T scans were used to estimate lobar and hippocampal volumes using FreeSurfer. Study participants (N = 145) included 63 patients with AD, (24 patients with EOAD [aged ≤65 years], 39 patients with LOAD [aged >65 years]), 25 healthy controls aged ≤65 years, and 57 healthy controls aged >65 years. Results: Hippocampal atrophy is the most prominent feature of both EOAD and LOAD compared with controls. Direct comparison between EOAD and LOAD showed that the differences between the groups did not remain after correcting for age. Discussion: Structurally, EOAD and LOAD does not seem to be different nosological entities. The difference in brain volumes between the groups compared with controls is likely due to age-related atrophy. © 2018 The Authors

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