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Intensification of ice nucleation observed in ocean ship emissions

Journal article
Authors Erik S Thomson
D. Weber
H. G. Bingemer
Jukka Tuomi
M. Ebert
Jan B. C. Pettersson
Published in Scientific Reports
Volume 8
ISSN 2045-2322
Publication year 2018
Published at Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology
Language en
Links doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-19297-y
Keywords static diffusion chamber, arctic stratus clouds, mixed-phase clouds, sea-ice, mineral dust, particles, aerosol, summer, nuclei, soot, Science & Technology - Other Topics
Subject categories Chemical Sciences

Abstract

Shipping contributes primary and secondary emission products to the atmospheric aerosol burden that have implications for climate, clouds, and air quality from regional to global scales. In this study we exam the potential impact of ship emissions with regards to ice nucleating particles. Particles that nucleate ice are known to directly affect precipitation and cloud microphysical properties. We have collected and analyzed particles for their ice nucleating capacity from a shipping channel outside a large Scandinavia port. We observe that ship plumes amplify the background levels of ice nucleating particles and discuss the larger scale implications. The measured ice nucleating particles suggest that the observed amplification is most likely important in regions with low levels of background particles. The Arctic, which as the sea ice pack declines is opening to transit and natural resource exploration and exploitation at an ever increasing rate, is highlighted as such a region.

Page Manager: Webmaster|Last update: 9/11/2012
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