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A Paleolithic-type diet results in iodine deficiency: a 2-year randomized trial in postmenopausal obese women.

Journal article
Authors Sofia Manousou
Maja Stål
Christel Larsson
C Mellberg
B Lindahl
Robert Eggertsen
Lena Hulthén
T Olsson
M Ryberg
S Sandberg
Helena Filipsson Nyström
Published in European journal of clinical nutrition
Volume 72
Issue 1
Pages 124-129
ISSN 1476-5640
Publication year 2017
Published at Institute of Medicine
Institute of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition
Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science
Pages 124-129
Language en
Links dx.doi.org/10.1038/ejcn.2017.134
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.f...
Subject categories Nutrition and Dietetics, Domestic science and nutrition

Abstract

Different diets are used for weight loss. A Paleolithic-type diet (PD) has beneficial metabolic effects, but two of the largest iodine sources, table salt and dairy products, are excluded. The objectives of this study were to compare 24-h urinary iodine concentration (24-UIC) in subjects on PD with 24-UIC in subjects on a diet according to the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations (NNR) and to study if PD results in a higher risk of developing iodine deficiency (ID), than NNR diet.A 2-year prospective randomized trial in a tertiary referral center where healthy postmenopausal overweight or obese women were randomized to either PD (n=35) or NNR diet (n=35). Dietary iodine intake, 24-UIC, 24-h urinary iodine excretion (24-UIE), free thyroxin (FT4), free triiodothyronine (FT3) and thyrotropin (TSH) were measured at baseline, 6 and 24 months. Completeness of urine sampling was monitored by para-aminobenzoic acid and salt intake by urinary sodium.At baseline, median 24-UIC (71.0 μg/l) and 24-UIE (134.0 μg/d) were similar in the PD and NNR groups. After 6 months, 24-UIC had decreased to 36.0 μg/l (P=0.001) and 24-UIE to 77.0 μg/d (P=0.001) in the PD group; in the NNR group, levels were unaltered. FT4, TSH and FT3 were similar in both groups, except for FT3 at 6 months being lower in PD than in NNR group.A PD results in a higher risk of developing ID, than a diet according to the NNR. Therefore, we suggest iodine supplementation should be considered when on a PD.European Journal of Clinical Nutrition advance online publication, 13 September 2017; doi:10.1038/ejcn.2017.134.

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