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Parents in adult psychiatric care and their children: a call for more interagency collaboration with social services and child and adolescent psychiatry

Journal article
Authors M. Afzelius
M. Ostman
Maria Råstam
G. Priebe
Published in Nordic Journal of Psychiatry
Volume 72
Issue 1
Pages 31-38
ISSN 0803-9488
Publication year 2018
Published at Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry
Pages 31-38
Language en
Links doi.org/10.1080/08039488.2017.13772...
Keywords Parental mental illness, children, child-focused intervention, interagency collaboration, psychiatric, serious mental-illness, bipolar disorder, ill parents, families, health, experiences, issues, interventions, metaanalysis, prevalence, Psychiatry
Subject categories Psychiatry

Abstract

Background: A parental mental illness affects all family members and should warrant a need for support.Aim: To investigate the extent to which psychiatric patients with underage children are the recipients of child-focused interventions and involved in interagency collaboration.Methods: Data were retrieved from a psychiatric services medical record database consisting of data regarding 29,972 individuals in southern Sweden and indicating the patients' main diagnoses, comorbidity, children below the age of 18, and child-focused interventions.Results: Among the patients surveyed, 12.9% had registered underage children. One-fourth of the patients received child-focused interventions from adult psychiatry, and out of these 30.7% were involved in interagency collaboration as compared to 7.7% without child-focused interventions. Overall, collaboration with child and adolescent psychiatric services was low for all main diagnoses. If a patient received child-focused interventions from psychiatric services, the likelihood of being involved in interagency collaboration was five times greater as compared to patients receiving no child-focused intervention when controlled for gender, main diagnosis, and inpatient care.Conclusions: Psychiatric services play a significant role in identifying the need for and initiating child-focused interventions in families with a parental mental illness, and need to develop and support strategies to enhance interagency collaboration with other welfare services.

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