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Developing a Prototyping Method for Involving Children in the Design of Classroom Robots

Journal article
Authors Mohammad Obaid
Gökçe Elif Baykal
Asım Evren Yantaç
Wolmet Barendregt
Published in International Journal of Social Robotics
Volume 10
Issue 2
Pages 279-291
ISSN 1875-4791
Publication year 2018
Published at Department of Applied Information Technology (GU)
Pages 279-291
Language en
Links https://doi.org/10.1007/s12369-017-...
https://gup.ub.gu.se/file/207463
Subject categories Robotics, Human Computer Interaction

Abstract

Including children in the design of technologies that will have an impact on their daily lives is one of the pillars of user-centered design. Educational robots are an example of such a technology where children’s involvement is important. However, the form in which this involvement should take place is still unclear. Children do not have a lot of experience with educational robots yet, while they do have some ideas of what robot could be like from popular media, such as BayMax from the Big Hero 6 movie. In this paper we describe two pilot studies to inform the development of an elicitation method focusing on form factors; a first study in which we have asked children between 8 and 15 years old to design their own classroom robot using a toolkit, the Robo2Box, and a second study where we have compared the use of the Robo2Box toolkit and clay as elicitation methods. We present the results of the two studies, and discuss the implications of the outcomes to inform further development of the Robo2Box for prototyping classroom robots by children.

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