To the top

Page Manager: Webmaster
Last update: 9/11/2012 3:13 PM

Tell a friend about this page
Print version

First-trimester smoking c… - University of Gothenburg, Sweden Till startsida
Sitemap
To content Read more about how we use cookies on gu.se

First-trimester smoking cessation in pregnancy did not increase the risk of preeclampsia/eclampsia: A Murmansk County Birth Registry study

Journal article
Authors O. A. Kharkova
A. M. Grjibovski
Alexandra Krettek
E. Nieboer
J. O. Odland
V. P. Rdiovascular Health
Published in Plos One
Volume 12
Issue 8
ISSN 1932-6203
Publication year 2017
Published at Institute of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition
Language en
Links doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.017935...
Keywords CIGARETTE-SMOKING, MATERNAL SMOKING, CARBON-MONOXIDE, WOMEN, HYPERTENSION, OUTCOMES, PATHOGENESIS, ECLAMPSIA, PLACENTA, HABITS
Subject categories Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology, Reproductive health

Abstract

Background Although prior studies have shown that smoking reduces preeclampsia/eclampsia risk, the consequence of giving up this habit during pregnancy should be assessed. The aims of the current study were threefold: (i) describe maternal characteristics of women with preeclampsia/ eclampsia; (ii) examine a possible association between the number of cigarettes smoked daily during pregnancy and the development of this affliction; and (iii) determine if first-trimester discontinuation of smoking during pregnancy influences the risk. A registry-based study was conducted using data from the Murmansk County Birth Registry (MCBR). It included women without pre-existing hypertension, who delivered a singleton infant during 2006-2011 and had attended the first antenatal visit before 12 week of gestation. We adjusted for potential confounders using logistic regression. The prevalence of preeclampsia/eclampsia was 8.3% (95% CI: 8.0-8.6). Preeclampsia/ eclampsia associated with maternal age, education, marital status, parity, excessive weight gain and body mass index at the first antenatal visit. There was a dose-response relationship between the number of smoked cigarettes per day during pregnancy and the risk of preeclampsia/ eclampsia (adjusted OR1-5 cig/day = 0.69 with 95% CI: 0.56-0.87; OR6-10 cig/day = 0.65 with 95% CI: 0.51-0.82; and OR (>= 11 cig/day) = 0.49 with 95% CI: 0.30-0.81). There was no difference in this risk among women who smoked before and during pregnancy and those who did so before but not during pregnancy (adjusted OR = 1.10 with 95% CI: 0.91-1.32). Preeclampsia/eclampsia was associated with maternal age, education, marital status, parity, excessive weight gain, and body mass index at the first antenatal visit. There was a negative dose-response relationship between the number of smoked cigarettes per day during pregnancy and the odds of preeclampsia/eclampsia. However, women who gave up smoking during the first trimester of gestation had the same risk of preeclampsia/eclampsia as those who smoked while pregnant. Consequently, antenatal clinic specialists are advised to take these various observations into account when counselling women on smoking cessation during pregnancy.

Page Manager: Webmaster|Last update: 9/11/2012
Share:

The University of Gothenburg uses cookies to provide you with the best possible user experience. By continuing on this website, you approve of our use of cookies.  What are cookies?