To the top

Page Manager: Webmaster
Last update: 9/11/2012 3:13 PM

Tell a friend about this page
Print version

Memory based lie detectio… - University of Gothenburg, Sweden Till startsida
Sitemap
To content Read more about how we use cookies on gu.se

Memory based lie detection: The effects of different memory enhancing techniques on delayed recall.

Poster
Authors Aleksandras Izotovas
A. Vrij
L. Hope
Pär-Anders Granhag
Published in European Association for Psychology and Law (EAPL). Toulouse, France: 5-8 July
Publication year 2016
Published at Department of Psychology
Language en
Links https://eapl2016.sciencesconf.org/
Keywords Deception detection, Reality Monitoring, Memory-enhancing techniques, Delay, Memory retrieval
Subject categories Applied Psychology

Abstract

Research to date has revealed significant differences between truth-tellers and liars in terms of quantity and quality of details provided in statements after a delay; especially when specific interviewing strategies have been used (e.g. strategic use of evidence or unanticipated questions or tasks; Lancaster, Vrij, Hope, & Walker, 2013; McDougall & Bull, 2015). Previous findings suggest that memory-enhancing techniques can aid in detecting deception (e.g. Hernández-Fernaud & Alonso-Quecuty, 1997; Vrij et al., 2010), however, it is not clear yet how they influence statements after a delay. In the current research we explore how memory-enhancing techniques (context reinstatement, sketch, and timeline) during an immediate interview after a target event affects the statements of truth-tellers and liars after a longer retention interval (two-week period). Interviews will be analysed using the Reality Monitoring approach (Johnson & Raye, 1981) and primarily focus on the amount of visual, spatial, temporal, and action details in the statements.

Page Manager: Webmaster|Last update: 9/11/2012
Share:

The University of Gothenburg uses cookies to provide you with the best possible user experience. By continuing on this website, you approve of our use of cookies.  What are cookies?