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Från bösiga knegare till goa gubbar - men var är tjejerna? Om män och maskulinitet i Göteborgs hamn

Magazine article
Authors Karin Hallberg
Gunilla Blomqvist
Published in Arbetarhistoria
Volume 1-2
Issue 161-162
Pages 54-63
ISSN 0281-7446
Publication year 2017
Published at School of Global Studies, Peace and Development Research
School of Global Studies
Pages 54-63
Language sv
Links www.arbetarhistoria.se/nr-161-162-2...
Keywords maskulinitet, Göteborgs hamn, genussegregation, hegemonisk maskulinitet, klassidentitet, hamnarbete
Subject categories Other Social Sciences

Abstract

This article investigates how masculinity constructions affect the male dominance in the Port of Gothenburg. It argues that the hegemonic masculinity in the port is created in close proximity to working-class and dockworker identities. However, the increased economic status of the dockworker profession, the influence of multinational companies in the port, and the entrance of new groups of men and women, gradually challenge these constructions. The article also explores how constructions of class and work identities intersect with constructions of gender identities. It argues that while working-class men are able to use their class positions as positive sources of identification, the reverse is often true for women. The article concludes that masculinity constructions, created in intersection with class identities, are an important reason for the low number of female dockworkers in the port of Gothenburg. But while these structures are resistant, they are likely to change in the years to come.

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