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The extent of using mobility assistive devices can partly explain fatigue among persons with late effects of polio - a retrospective registry study in Sweden

Journal article
Authors Iolanda Santos Tavares Silva
Katharina S Sunnerhagen
Carin Willén
Isabelle Ottenvall Hammar
Published in Bmc Neurology
Volume 16
ISSN 1471-2377
Publication year 2016
Published at Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Department of Health and Rehabilitation
Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Rehabilitation
Centre for Ageing and Health (Agecap)
Language en
Links dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12883-016-0753-...
https://gup.ub.gu.se/file/206917
Keywords Post poliomyelitis syndrome, Occupational therapy, Multidimensional fatigue inventory (MFI-20), postpoliomyelitis syndrome, immigrants, inventory, health, Neurosciences & Neurology
Subject categories Other Medical Sciences

Abstract

Background: Fatigue is reported as one of the most disabling symptoms and is common among persons living with late effects of polio. Although fatigue has been studied in the context of people living with late effects of polio, there is a lack of knowledge concerning the association of fatigue and variables of importance for participation in daily life. Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore possible factors associated with fatigue among persons with late effects of polio in Sweden. Methods: This retrospective registry study consisted of 89 persons with late effects of polio living in Sweden. Fatigue was measured with the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI-20) scale, Swedish version. Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to analyse the correlation between the factors and fatigue, and a multiple linear regression was carried out to explore factors for fatigue. Results: Fatigue statistically significantly correlated with age (r = 0.234, p < 0.05) and the use of mobility assistive devices (r = 0.255, p < 0.05). The multiple linear regression model showed that the factors age (beta = 0.304, p < 0.019) and mobility assistive devices (beta = 0.262, p < 0.017) were associated with fatigue among persons living with late effects of polio, and the model partly explained 14% of the variation of fatigue. Conclusions: Fatigue could partly be explained by the extent of using mobility assistive devices and age. Healthcare professionals should provide and demonstrate the importance of assistive devices to ensure management of fatigue in persons living with late effects of polio.

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