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The Gothenburg MCI study: design and distribution of Alzheimer's disease and subcortical vascular disease diagnoses from baseline to 6-year follow-up.

Journal article
Authors Anders Wallin
Arto Nordlund
Michael Jonsson
Karin Lind
Åke Edman
Mattias Göthlin
Jacob Stålhammar
Marie Eckerström
Silke Kern
Anne Börjesson-Hanson
Mårten Carlsson
Erik Olsson
Henrik Zetterberg
Kaj Blennow
Johan Svensson
Annika Öhrfelt Olsson
Maria Bjerke
Sindre Rolstad
Carl Eckerström
Published in Journal of cerebral blood flow and metabolism : official journal of the International Society of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism
Volume 36
Issue 1
Pages 114-131
ISSN 1559-7016
Publication year 2016
Published at Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology
Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry
Institute of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition
Centre for Ageing and Health (Agecap)
Pages 114-131
Language en
Links dx.doi.org/10.1038/jcbfm.2015.147
Keywords Alzheimer’s disease cerebrovascular disease cognitive impairment subcortical vascular dementia white matter changes
Subject categories Neurosciences

Abstract

There is a need for increased nosological knowledge to enable rational trials in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related disorders. The ongoing Gothenburg mild cognitive impairment (MCI) study is an attempt to conduct longitudinal in-depth phenotyping of patients with different forms and degrees of cognitive impairment using neuropsychological, neuroimaging, and neurochemical tools. Particular attention is paid to the interplay between AD and subcortical vascular disease, the latter representing a disease entity that may cause or contribute to cognitive impairment with an effect size that may be comparable to AD. Of 664 patients enrolled between 1999 and 2013, 195 were diagnosed with subjective cognitive impairment (SCI), 274 with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 195 with dementia, at baseline. Of the 195 (29%) patients with dementia at baseline, 81 (42%) had AD, 27 (14%) SVD, 41 (21%) mixed type dementia (=AD+SVD=MixD), and 46 (23%) other etiologies. After 6 years, 292 SCI/MCI patients were eligible for follow-up. Of these 292, 69 (24%) had converted to dementia (29 (42%) AD, 16 (23%) SVD, 15 (22%) MixD, 9 (13%) other etiologies). The study has shown that it is possible to identify not only AD but also incipient and manifest MixD/SVD in a memory clinic setting. These conditions should be taken into account in clinical trials.Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow & Metabolism advance online publication, 15 July 2015; doi:10.1038/jcbfm.2015.147.

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