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Warmer water temperature results in oxidative damage in an Antarctic fish, the bald notothen

Journal article
Authors Bethanie Carney Almroth
Noomi Asker
Britt Wassmur
Malin Rosengren
Fredrik Jutfelt
A. Grans
Kristina Sundell
Michael Axelsson
Joachim Sturve
Published in Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology
Volume 468
Pages 130-137
ISSN 0022-0981
Publication year 2015
Published at Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences
Pages 130-137
Language en
Links dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jembe.2015.02....
Keywords Fish, Global warming, Oxidative stress, Oxidative damage, Polar, MICROTITER PLATE ASSAY, GLUTATHIONE DISULFIDE, GOLDFISH TISSUES, GENE-EXPRESSION, RAINBOW-TROUT, STRESS, ACCLIMATION, ANTIOXIDANT, PERFORMANCE, APOPTOSIS, Ecology, Marine & Freshwater Biology
Subject categories Environmental Sciences

Abstract

Global climate change is predicted to result in increases in water temperature in the polar regions, but the full consequences of this for marine fish species are not understood, especially with regard to cellular mechanisms underlying oxidative stress. Warmer temperatures could potentially result in increased oxidative stress, and it is not known whether stenothermal fish can cope with this on a cellular and physiological level. In order to address this, we exposed bald notothen (Pagothenta borchgrevinki), a fish species endemic to Antarctica, to an increase in temperature from -1.6 degrees C to 4 degrees C and measured the effects on oxidative stress including antioxidant defenses, oxidative damage in proteins and lipids, and transcriptional regulation of involved genes. We show that the fish responds to an acute (12 h) temperature increase with increased antioxidant defenses. However, these antioxidant defenses were similar to basal levels following long-term (3 weeks) exposure to the higher temperature and moreover, these individuals also had higher levels of oxidative damage. These results indicate that this species has the ability to alter levels of endogenous antioxidants, but that this response is transient and insufficient to protect against oxidative damage. These effects may have serious consequences for these fish in a warmer future since long-term consequences of this accumulation of damaged lipids and proteins are associated with aging and known to include decreased cellular function, disease and eventually cell death. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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