To the top

Page Manager: Webmaster
Last update: 9/11/2012 3:13 PM

Tell a friend about this page
Print version

Histamine Promotes the De… - University of Gothenburg, Sweden Till startsida
Sitemap
To content Read more about how we use cookies on gu.se

Histamine Promotes the Development of Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells and Reduces Tumor Growth by Targeting the Myeloid NADPH Oxidase

Journal article
Authors Anna Martner
Hanna Grauers Wiktorin
Brianna Lenox
Frida Ewald Sander
Ebru Aydin
Johan Aurelius
Fredrik Bergh Thorén
Anders Ståhlberg
Svante Hermodsson
Kristoffer Hellstrand
Published in Journal of Immunology
Volume 194
Issue 10
Pages 5014-5021
ISSN 0022-1767
Publication year 2015
Published at Sahlgrenska Cancer Center
Pages 5014-5021
Language en
Links dx.doi.org/10.4049/jimmunol.1402991
Keywords REACTIVE OXYGEN METABOLITES, ANTIGEN-PRESENTING CELLS, CYTOKINE, PRODUCTION, LEUKEMIA, CANCER, DYSFUNCTION, EXPRESSION, RESPONSES, ENCEPHALOMYELITIS, DIFFERENTIATION, Immunology
Subject categories Immunology in the medical area

Abstract

The efficiency of immune-mediated clearance of cancer cells is hampered by immunosuppressive mediators in the malignant microenvironment, including NADPH oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species. We aimed at defining the effects of histamine, an inhibitor of the myeloid NADPH oxidase/NOX2, on the development of Ag-presenting dendritic cells (DCs) from myeloid precursors and the impact of these mechanisms for tumor growth. Histamine was found to promote the maturation of human DCs from monocytes by increasing the expression of HLA-DR and costimulatory molecules, which resulted in improved induction of Th cells with Th0 polarity. Experiments using wild-type and NOX2-deficient myelomonoblastic cells showed that histamine facilitated myeloid cell maturation only in cells capable of generating reactive oxygen species. Treatment of mice with histamine reduced the growth of murine EL-4 lymphomas in parallel with an increment of tumor-infiltrating DCs in NOX2-sufficient mice but not in NOX2-deficient (gp91(phox-/-)) mice. We propose that strategies to target the myeloid NADPH oxidase may facilitate the development of endogenous DCs in cancer.

Page Manager: Webmaster|Last update: 9/11/2012
Share:

The University of Gothenburg uses cookies to provide you with the best possible user experience. By continuing on this website, you approve of our use of cookies.  What are cookies?