To the top

Page Manager: Webmaster
Last update: 9/11/2012 3:13 PM

Tell a friend about this page
Print version

Filter-Dense Multicolor M… - University of Gothenburg, Sweden Till startsida
Sitemap
To content Read more about how we use cookies on gu.se

Filter-Dense Multicolor Microscopy

Journal article
Authors Siavash Kijani
Ulf Yrlid
Maria Heyden
Malin Levin
Jan Borén
Per Fogelstrand
Published in Plos One
Volume 10
Issue 3
ISSN 1932-6203
Publication year 2015
Published at Wallenberg Laboratory
Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Microbiology and Immunology
Institute of Medicine, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine
Language en
Links dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.011...
Keywords CELL SUBSETS, ATHEROSCLEROSIS, FLUORESCENCE, IMMUNOFLUORESCENCE, MACROPHAGES, DISTINCT, Multidisciplinary Sciences
Subject categories Immunology in the medical area

Abstract

Immunofluorescence microscopy is a unique method to reveal the spatial location of proteins in tissues and cells. By combining antibodies that are labeled with different fluorochromes, the location of several proteins can simultaneously be visualized in one sample. However, because of the risk of bleed-through signals between fluorochromes, standard multicolor microscopy is restricted to a maximum of four fluorescence channels, including one for nuclei staining. This is not always enough to address common scientific questions. In particular, the use of a rapidly increasing number of marker proteins to classify functionally distinct cell populations and diseased tissues emphasizes the need for more complex multistainings. Hence, multicolor microscopy should ideally offer more channels to meet the current needs in biomedical science. Here we present an enhanced multi-fluorescence setup, which we call Filter-Dense Multicolor Microscopy (FDMM). FDMM is based on condensed filter sets that are more specific for each fluorochrome and allow a more economic use of the light spectrum. FDMM allows at least six independent fluorescence channels and can be applied to any standard fluorescence microscope without changing any operative procedures for the user. In the present study, we demonstrate an FDMM setup of six channels that includes the most commonly used fluorochromes for histology. We show that the FDMM setup is specific and robust, and we apply the technique on typical biological questions that require more than four fluorescence microscope channels.

Page Manager: Webmaster|Last update: 9/11/2012
Share:

The University of Gothenburg uses cookies to provide you with the best possible user experience. By continuing on this website, you approve of our use of cookies.  What are cookies?