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Association study between autistic-like traits and polymorphisms in the autism candidate regions RELN, CNTNAP2, SHANK3, and CDH9/10.

Journal article
Authors Lina Jonsson
Anna Zettergren
Erik Pettersson
Daniel Hovey
Henrik Anckarsäter
Lars Westberg
Paul Lichtenstein
Sebastian Lundström
Jonas Melke
Published in Molecular autism
Volume 5
Issue 1
Pages 55
ISSN 2040-2392
Publication year 2014
Published at Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Department of Pharmacology
Centre for Ethics, Law, and Mental Health
Pages 55
Language en
Links dx.doi.org/10.1186/2040-2392-5-55
Subject categories Pharmacology, Neuroscience

Abstract

Autistic-like traits (ALTs) are continuously distributed in the general population, with the autism spectrum disorder (ASD) at the upper extreme end. A genetic overlap has been shown between ALTs and ASD, indicating that common variation in ASD candidate genes may also influence ALTs. In our study, we have investigated the SNP rs4307059 that has been associated with both ALTs and ASD. In addition, we genotyped polymorphisms in a selection of genes involved in synaptic functioning, that is, SHANK3, RELN, and CNTNAP2, which repeatedly have been associated with ASD. The possible associations of these polymorphisms with ALTs, as well as genetic factors for neurodevelopmental problems (NDPs), were investigated in a large cohort from the general population: The Child and Adolescent Twin Study in Sweden. For analyses of ALTs and NDPs, 12,319 subjects (including 2,268 monozygotic (MZ) and 3,805 dizygotic (DZ) twin pairs) and 8,671 subjects (including 2,243 MZ and 2,044 DZ twin pairs), respectively, were included in the analyses.

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