To the top

Page Manager: Webmaster
Last update: 9/11/2012 3:13 PM

Tell a friend about this page
Print version

In whose name and in whos… - University of Gothenburg, Sweden Till startsida
Sitemap
To content Read more about how we use cookies on gu.se

In whose name and in whose interests? An actor-oriented analysis of community forestry in Bey, a Khmer village in Northeast Cambodia

Chapter in book
Authors Robin Biddulph
Published in Milne, S & S. Mahanty (2015) Conservation and Development in Cambodia: Exploring frontiers of change in nature, state and society
Pages 160-176
ISBN 0415706807
Publisher Earthscan
Place of publication Abingdon
Publication year 2015
Published at Department of Economy and Society, Unit for Human Geography
Pages 160-176
Language en
Keywords Cambodia, community forestry, political ecology, political society,
Subject categories Earth and Related Environmental Sciences, Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalization Studies), Social and Economic Geography, Human Geography

Abstract

Written by leading authorities from Australasia, Europe and North America, this book examines the dynamic conflicts and synergies between nature conservation and human development in contemporary Cambodia. After suffering conflict and stagnation in the late twentieth century, Cambodia has experienced an economic transformation in the last decade, with growth averaging almost ten per cent per year, partly through investment from China. However this rush for development has been coupled with tremendous social and environmental change which, although positive in some aspects, has led to rising inequality and profound shifts in the condition, ownership and management of natural resources. High deforestation rates, declining fish stocks, biodiversity loss, and alienation of indigenous and rural people from their land and traditional livelihoods are now matters of increasing local and international concern. The book explores the social and political dimensions of these environmental changes in Cambodia, and of efforts to intervene in and ‘improve’ current trajectories for conservation and development. It provides a compelling analysis of the connections between nature, state and society, pointing to the key role of grassroots and non-state actors in shaping Cambodia’s frontiers of change. These insights will be of great interest to scholars of Southeast Asia and environment-development issues in general.

Page Manager: Webmaster|Last update: 9/11/2012
Share:

The University of Gothenburg uses cookies to provide you with the best possible user experience. By continuing on this website, you approve of our use of cookies.  What are cookies?