To the top

Page Manager: Webmaster
Last update: 9/11/2012 3:13 PM

Tell a friend about this page
Print version

Brown Adipose Tissue Impr… - University of Gothenburg, Sweden Till startsida
Sitemap
To content Read more about how we use cookies on gu.se

Brown Adipose Tissue Improves Whole-Body Glucose Homeostasis and Insulin Sensitivity in Humans

Journal article
Authors M. Chondronikola
E. Volpi
E. Borsheim
C. Porter
P. Annamalai
Sven Enerbäck
Martin Lidell
M. K. Saraf
S. M. Labbe
N. M. Hurren
C. Yfanti
T. Chao
C. R. Andersen
F. Cesani
H. Hawkins
L. S. Sidossis
Published in Diabetes
Volume 63
Issue 12
Pages 4089-4099
ISSN 0012-1797
Publication year 2014
Published at Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Medical and Clinical Genetics
Pages 4089-4099
Language en
Links dx.doi.org/10.2337/db14-0746
Keywords TYPE-2 DIABETIC SUBJECTS, FATTY-ACID-METABOLISM, COLD-EXPOSURE, ADULT, HUMANS, RESISTANCE, THERMOGENESIS, ACTIVATION, REDUCTION, OXIDATION, EXERCISE, Endocrinology & Metabolism
Subject categories Clinical Medicine

Abstract

Brown adipose tissue (BAT) has attracted scientific interest as an antidiabetic tissue owing to its ability to dissipate energy as heat. Despite a plethora of data concerning the role of BAT in glucose metabolism in rodents, the role of BAT (if any) in glucose metabolism in humans remains unclear. To investigate whether BAT activation alters whole-body glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity in humans, we studied seven BAT-positive (BAT(+)) men and five BAT-negative (BAT(-)) men under thermoneutral conditions and after prolonged (5-8 h) cold exposure (CE). The two groups were similar in age, BMI, and adiposity. CE significantly increased resting energy expenditure, whole-body glucose disposal, plasma glucose oxidation, and insulin sensitivity in the BAT+ group only. These results demonstrate a physiologically significant role of BAT in whole-body energy expenditure, glucose homeostasis, and insulin sensitivity in humans, and support the notion that BAT may function as an antidiabetic tissue in humans.

Page Manager: Webmaster|Last update: 9/11/2012
Share:

The University of Gothenburg uses cookies to provide you with the best possible user experience. By continuing on this website, you approve of our use of cookies.  What are cookies?