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Temperature acclimation rate of aerobic scope and feeding metabolism in fishes: implications in a thermally extreme future

Journal article
Authors Erik Sandblom
Albin Gräns
Michael Axelsson
Henrik Seth
Published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B-Biological Sciences
Volume 281
Issue 1794
ISSN 0962-8452
Publication year 2014
Published at Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology
Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences
Language en
Links dx.doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2014.1490
Keywords climate change, digestion, metabolic rate, sculpin, specific dynamic action, thermal compensation, CLIMATE-CHANGE, OXYGEN-CONSUMPTION, DYNAMIC ACTION, RAINBOW-TROUT, ONCORHYNCHUS-MYKISS, MARINE ECOSYSTEMS, OXIDATIVE MUSCLE, COLD, ADAPTATION, TIME-COURSE, PLASTICITY
Subject categories Zoology, Marine ecology

Abstract

Temperature acclimation may offset the increased energy expenditure (standard metabolic rate, SMR) and reduced scope for activity (aerobic scope, AS) predicted to occur with local and global warming in fishes and other ectotherms. Yet, the time course and mechanisms of this process is little understood. Acclimation dynamics of SMR, maximum metabolic rate, AS and the specific dynamic action of feeding (SDA) were determined in shorthorn sculpin (Myoxocephalus scorpius) after transfer from 10 degrees C to 16 degrees C. SMR increased in the first week by 82% reducing AS to 55% of initial values, while peak postprandial metabolism was initially greater. This meant that the estimated AS during peak SDA approached zero, constraining digestion and leaving little room for additional aerobic processes. After eight weeks at 16 degrees C, SMR was restored, while AS and the estimated AS during peak SDA recovered partly. Collectively, this demonstrated a considerable capacity for metabolic thermal compensation, which should be better incorporated into future models on organismal responses to climate change. A mathematical model based on the empirical data suggested that phenotypes with fast acclimation rates may be favoured by natural selection as the accumulated energetic cost of a slow acclimation rate increases in a warmer future with exacerbated thermal variations.

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