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Serum fatty acid profile does not reflect seafood intake in adolescents with atopic eczema.

Journal article
Authors Malin Barman
Karin Jonsson
Anna Sandin
Agnes E Wold
Ann-Sofie Sandberg
Published in Acta Paediatrica
Volume 103
Issue 9
Pages 968–976
ISSN 0803-5253
Publication year 2014
Published at Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Infectious Medicine
Pages 968–976
Language en
Links dx.doi.org/10.1111/apa.12690
https://gup.ub.gu.se/file/157553
Keywords Allergy;Asthma;Atopic eczema;Fatty acids;Polyunsaturated fatty acids
Subject categories Chemical Sciences, Immunology in the medical area, Pediatrics

Abstract

AIM: Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs) are immunomodulatory, but their role in allergy development is controversial. We investigated whether proportions of LCPUFAs in serum phospholipids were related to allergic diagnosis, seafood intake and LCPUFA proportions in cord blood.

METHODS: Serum was obtained from 148 birth cohort children at 13 years of age. Forty had atopic eczema, 53 had respiratory allergy, and 55 were nonallergic. Proportions of LCPUFAs were determined in serum phospholipids; cord blood from 128 of the individuals was previously analysed. Seafood intake was estimated using questionnaires.

RESULTS: Allergic and nonallergic individuals did not differ significantly regarding individual LCPUFAs. However, arachidonic acid over docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) ratio was higher in allergic, compared with nonallergic, adolescents. In nonallergic individuals, LCPUFA proportions in cord serum and adolescent serum correlated weakly. In individuals with atopic eczema and respiratory allergy, these correlations were weak or absent. A moderate correlation between seafood intake and serum DHA was seen in nonallergic individuals and those with respiratory allergy, but not in those with atopic eczema.

CONCLUSION: Serum LCPUFA pattern was similar in allergic and nonallergic adolescents. Fatty acid metabolism may be altered in atopic eczema subjects, suggested by poor correlations between fatty acid intake and serum levels.

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