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Sex-specific trends in 4-year survival in 37 276 men and women with acute myocardial infarction before the age of 55 years in Sweden, 1987-2006: a register-based cohort study.

Journal article
Authors Susanne Nielsen
Lena Björck
Johanna Berg
Kok Wai Giang
Tatiana Zverkova Sandström
Kristin Falk
Sylvia Määttä
Annika Rosengren
Published in BMJ open
Volume 4
Issue 5
Pages e004598
ISSN 2044-6055
Publication year 2014
Published at Institute of Health and Care Sciences
Institute of Medicine, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine
Pages e004598
Language en
Links dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2013-004...
Subject categories Cardiovascular medicine

Abstract

To examine sex-specific trends in 4-year mortality among young patients with first acute myocardial infarction (AMI), 1987-2006. Results From the first to last 5-year period, the absolute excess risk decreased from 1.38 to 0.50 and 1.53 to 0.59 per 100 person-years among men aged 25–44 and 45–54 years, respectively. Corresponding figures for women were a decrease from 2.26 to 1.17 and from 1.93 to 1.45 per 100 person-years, respectively. Trends for women were non-linear, decreasing to the same extent as those for men until the third period, then increasing. For the last 5-year period, the standardised mortality ratio for young survivors of AMI compared with the general population was 4.34 (95% CI 3.04 to 5.87) and 2.43 (95% CI 2.12 to 2.76) for men aged 25–44 and 45–54 years, respectively, and 13.53 (95% CI 8.36 to 19.93) and 6.42 (95% CI 5.24 to 7.73) for women, respectively. Deaths not associated with cardiovascular causes increased from 21.5% to 44.6% in men and 41.5% to 65.9% in women. Conclusions Young male survivors of AMI have low absolute long-term mortality rates, but these rates remain twofold to fourfold that of the general population. After favourable development until 2001, women now have higher absolute mortality than men and a 6-fold to 14-fold risk of death compared with women in the general population.

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