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The zebrafish amyloid precursor protein-b is required for motor neuron guidance and synapse formation.

Journal article
Authors Alexandra Abramsson
Petronella Kettunen
Rakesh Kumar Banote
Emelie Lott
Mei Li
Anders Arner
Henrik Zetterberg
Published in Developmental biology
Volume 381
Issue 2
Pages 377-88
ISSN 1095-564X
Publication year 2013
Published at Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry
Pages 377-88
Language en
Links dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ydbio.2013.06....
Subject categories Neurosciences, Neurochemistry

Abstract

The amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a transmembrane protein mostly recognized for its association with Alzheimer's disease. The physiological function of APP is still not completely understood much because of the redundancy between genes in the APP family. In this study we have used zebrafish to study the physiological function of the zebrafish APP homologue, appb, during development. We show that appb is expressed in post-mitotic neurons in the spinal cord. Knockdown of appb by 50-60% results in a behavioral phenotype with increased spontaneous coiling and prolonged touch-induced activity. The spinal cord motor neurons in these embryos show defective formation and axonal outgrowth patterning. Reduction in Appb also results in patterning defects and changed density of pre- and post-synapses in the neuromuscular junctions. Together, our data show that development of functional locomotion in zebrafish depends on a critical role of Appb in the patterning of motor neurons and neuromuscular junctions.

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