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Aberrant alteration of vascular endothelial growth factor-family signaling in human tubal ectopic pregnancy: what is known and unknown?

Journal article
Authors Linus Ruijin Shao
Junting Hu
Yi Feng
Håkan Billig
Published in International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Pathology
Volume 6
Issue 4
Pages 810-815
ISSN 1936-2625
Publication year 2013
Published at Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Department of Physiology
Pages 810-815
Language en
Keywords VEGF, VEGF receptor, fallopian tube, ectopic pregnancy, oviductal epithelial-cells, messenger-rna expression, tyrosine kinase-1, secretion, stromal fibroblasts, intrauterine pregnancy, fallopian-tube, factor vegf, in-vitro, estrogen, mechanisms
Subject categories Clinical Medicine

Abstract

More than 98% of ectopic pregnancies occur in the Fallopian tube. Because many facets of tubal ectopic pregnancy remain unclear, prediction, prevention and treatment of tubal ectopic pregnancy are still a major clinical challenge. Compelling evidence suggests that angiogenic growth factors are involved in normal and abnormal implantation. While acknowledging the importance of an intrauterine pregnancy requires the development of a local blood supply and angiogenesis, we hypothesize that the hypoxic- and estrogen-dependent regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor/placental growth factor expression, secretion, and signaling pathways that are possibly involved in the pathophysiology of tubal ectopic pregnancy. Our hypothesis may also lead to a new therapeutic strategy for women with tubal ectopic pregnancy.

Page Manager: Webmaster|Last update: 9/11/2012
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