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Eating Problems and Overlap with ADHD and Autism Spectrum Disorders in a Nationwide Twin Study of 9- and 12-Year-Old Children.

Journal article
Authors Maria Råstam
Jakob Täljemark
Armin Tajnia
Sebastian Lundström
Peik Gustafsson
Paul Lichtenstein
Christopher Gillberg
Henrik Anckarsäter
Nora Kerekes
Published in Scientific World Journal
Pages article ID 315429
ISSN 1537-744X
Publication year 2013
Published at Gillberg Neuropsychiatry Centre
Centre for Ethics, Law, and Mental Health
Pages article ID 315429
Language en
Links dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/315429
https://gup.ub.gu.se/file/124366
Subject categories Child and adolescent psychiatry

Abstract

Aim. To establish the prevalence of restrictive eating problems, the overlap and association with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and to estimate the heritability of eating problems in a general population sample of twins aged 9 and 12. Methods. Parents of all Swedish 9- and 12-year-old twin pairs born between 1993 and 1998 (n = 12,366) were interviewed regarding symptoms of ADHD, ASD, and eating problems (EAT-P). Intraclass correlations and structural equation modelling were used for evaluating the influence of genetic and environmental factors. Cross-twin, cross-trait correlations were used to indicate a possible overlap between conditions. Results. The prevalence of eating problems was 0.6% in the study population and was significantly higher in children with ADHD and/or ASD. Among children with eating problems, 40% were screened positive for ADHD and/or ASD. Social interaction problems were strongly associated with EAT-P in girls, and impulsivity and activity problems with EAT-P in boys. The cross-twin, cross-trait correlations suggested low correlations between EAT-P and ADHD or EAT-P and ASD. Genetic effects accounted for 44% of the variation in liability for eating problems. Conclusions. In the group with eating problems, there was a clear overrepresentation of individuals with ADHD and/or ASD symptoms.

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