To the top

Page Manager: Webmaster
Last update: 9/11/2012 3:13 PM

Tell a friend about this page
Print version

Ten-year follow-up of ado… - University of Gothenburg, Sweden Till startsida
Sitemap
To content Read more about how we use cookies on gu.se

Ten-year follow-up of adolescent-onset anorexia nervosa: physical health and neurodevelopment.

Journal article
Authors Elisabet Wentz
I Carina Gillberg
Christopher Gillberg
Maria Råstam
Published in Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology
Volume 42
Issue 5
Pages 328-333
ISSN 0012-1622
Publication year 2000
Published at Institute for the Health of Women and Children, Dept of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Pages 328-333
Language en
Links dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-8749.2000...
Keywords Adolescent, Anorexia Nervosa, Diagnosis, Psychology, Anthropometry, Dyskinesias, Diagnosis, Psychology, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Health Status, Humans, Male, Neurologic Examination, Neuropsychological Tests
Subject categories Child and adolescent psychiatry

Abstract

To study the development of physical health and some neuromotor functions in anorexia nervosa (AN) 51 individuals (48 females, three males) with a mean AN onset of 14 years, recruited after community screening, were followed prospectively together with 51 age-, sex-, and school-matched individuals without AN (controls). About 10 years after AN onset, all individuals were examined in respect of physical health and neurodevelopment. There were no deaths. Weight and height had normalised, except in three participants with persistent AN. Significantly more participants with AN had a physical complaint/disorder, including hirsutism. This might be a long-term complication in weight restored AN. Dysdiadochokinesis occurred almost exclusively among individuals with former AN in accordance with our previous studies.

Page Manager: Webmaster|Last update: 9/11/2012
Share:

The University of Gothenburg uses cookies to provide you with the best possible user experience. By continuing on this website, you approve of our use of cookies.  What are cookies?