To the top

Page Manager: Webmaster
Last update: 9/11/2012 3:13 PM

Tell a friend about this page
Print version

Outcome of teenage-onset … - University of Gothenburg, Sweden Till startsida
Sitemap
To content Read more about how we use cookies on gu.se

Outcome of teenage-onset anorexia nervosa in a Swedish community-based sample

Journal article
Authors Maria Råstam
Christopher Gillberg
Elisabet Wentz
Published in European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Volume 12
Pages 178-190
ISSN 1018-8827
Publication year 2003
Published at Institute for the Health of Women and Children, Dept of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Pages 178-190
Language en
Keywords Adolescent, Adult, Age of Onset, Anorexia Nervosa, Epidemiology, Psychology, Autistic Disorder, Epidemiology, Community Health Centers, Comorbidity, Compulsive Personality Disorder, Epidemiology, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Interview, Psychological, Male, Prospective Studies, Sweden, Epidemiology, Treatment, Outcome
Subject categories Medical and Health Sciences, Psychiatry

Abstract

In a prospective long-term outcome study of a representative sample of teenage-onset anorexia nervosa (AN), 51 individuals with AN, recruited after community screening, were contrasted with 51 matched comparison cases at a mean age of 24 years (10 years after AN onset). All 102 cases had been examined at age 16 and 21 years. At 24 years all probands were interviewed regarding mental and physical health, and overall outcome was assessed. Ten-year outcome of teenage-onset AN seemed to be relatively favourable in that half of all cases were free from eating disorder (ED) and other axis I disorder. There were no deaths. However, one in four in the AN group had a persisting ED, 3 of whom still had AN. Lifetime diagnoses of affective disorders and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) were overrepresented in the AN group. Affective disorders coincided with the ED, and were not a problem after recovery from the ED. On the other hand, OCD, OCPD (obsessive-compulsive personality disorder), and/or autism spectrum disorder continued to characterise more than one-third of the AN cases. One in six of the AN group had persistent problems with social interaction and obsessive compulsive behaviours from childhood into early adult years. Half the AN group had a poor overall outcome. These were subjects with either persisting ED or lifelong problems with social interaction and obsessive compulsive behaviour.

Page Manager: Webmaster|Last update: 9/11/2012
Share:

The University of Gothenburg uses cookies to provide you with the best possible user experience. By continuing on this website, you approve of our use of cookies.  What are cookies?