To the top

Page Manager: Webmaster
Last update: 9/11/2012 3:13 PM

Tell a friend about this page
Print version

The two mucus layers of c… - University of Gothenburg, Sweden Till startsida
Sitemap
To content Read more about how we use cookies on gu.se

The two mucus layers of colon are organized by the MUC2 mucin, whereas the outer layer is a legislator of host-microbial interactions.

Journal article
Authors Malin E V Johansson
Jessica Holmén Larsson
Gunnar C. Hansson
Published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume 108 Suppl 1
Pages 4659-65
ISSN 1091-6490
Publication year 2011
Published at Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Cell Biology
Pages 4659-65
Language en
Links dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1006451107
Keywords Animals, Colon, anatomy & histology, microbiology, Glycosylation, Goblet Cells, cytology, secretion, Humans, Intestinal Mucosa, cytology, metabolism, microbiology, Metagenome, Mice, Models, Biological, Mucin-2, biosynthesis, chemistry, metabolism, Symbiosis
Subject categories Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy)

Abstract

The normal intestinal microbiota inhabits the colon mucus without triggering an inflammatory response. The reason for this and how the intestinal mucus of the colon is organized have begun to be unraveled. The mucus is organized in two layers: an inner, stratified mucus layer that is firmly adherent to the epithelial cells and approximately 50 μm thick; and an outer, nonattached layer that is usually approximately 100 μm thick as measured in mouse. These mucus layers are organized around the highly glycosylated MUC2 mucin, forming a large, net-like polymer that is secreted by the goblet cells. The inner mucus layer is dense and does not allow bacteria to penetrate, thus keeping the epithelial cell surface free from bacteria. The inner mucus layer is converted into the outer layer, which is the habitat of the commensal flora. The outer mucus layer has an expanded volume due to proteolytic activities provided by the host but probably also caused by commensal bacterial proteases and glycosidases. The numerous O-glycans on the MUC2 mucin not only serve as nutrients for the bacteria but also as attachment sites and, as such, probably contribute to the selection of the species-specific colon flora. This observation that normal human individuals carry a uniform MUC2 mucin glycan array in colon may indicate such a specific selection.

Page Manager: Webmaster|Last update: 9/11/2012
Share:

The University of Gothenburg uses cookies to provide you with the best possible user experience. By continuing on this website, you approve of our use of cookies.  What are cookies?