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Subcortical vascular dementia biomarker pattern in mild cognitive impairment.

Journal article
Authors Maria Bjerke
Ulf Andreasson
Sindre Rolstad
Arto Nordlund
Karin Lind
Henrik Zetterberg
Åke Edman
Kaj Blennow
Anders Wallin
Published in Dementia and geriatric cognitive disorders
Volume 28
Issue 4
Pages 348-56
ISSN 1421-9824
Publication year 2009
Published at Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry
Pages 348-56
Language en
Links dx.doi.org/10.1159/000252773
Subject categories Psychiatry

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is an etiologically unclear disorder. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers are potentially useful for the differentiation between various MCI etiologies. AIM: The aim of the study was to assess whether baseline CSF hyperphosphorylated tau (P-tau), total tau (T-tau), amyloid beta 1-42 (Abeta(42)) and neurofilament light (NF-L) in patients with MCI could predict subcortical vascular dementia (SVD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) at follow-up. METHODS: Biomarker levels were assessed by Luminex xMAP technology and ELISA. RESULTS: Increased baseline concentrations of NF-L significantly separated MCI-SVD from stable MCI. The MCI-SVD patients were inseparable from stable MCI but separable from patients developing AD (MCI-AD) on the basis of Abeta(42,) T-tau and P-tau(181) levels. CONCLUSION: A combination of the biomarkers Abeta(42), T-tau, P-tau(181) and NF-L has the potential to improve the clinical separation of MCI-SVD patients from stable MCI and MCI-AD patients.

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