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Extinction rates in tumour public goods games

Journal article
Authors Philip Gerlee
P. M. Altrock
Published in Journal of the Royal Society Interface
Volume 14
Issue 134
ISSN 1742-5689
Publication year 2017
Published at Department of Mathematical Sciences
Language en
Links doi.org/10.1098/rsif.2017.0342
Keywords evolutionary game theory, cancer evolution, replicator equation, logistic growth, fixation times, clonal evolution, cancer, heterogeneity, dynamics, models, strategies, supports, growth, cells
Subject categories Mathematics, Cancer and Oncology

Abstract

Cancer evolution and progression are shaped by cellular interactions and Darwinian selection. Evolutionary game theory incorporates both of these principles, and has been proposed as a framework to understand tumour cell population dynamics. A cornerstone of evolutionary dynamics is the replicator equation, which describes changes in the relative abundance of different cell types, and is able to predict evolutionary equilibria. Typically, the replicator equation focuses on differences in relative fitness. We here showthat this framework might not be sufficient under all circumstances, as it neglects important aspects of population growth. Standard replicator dynamics might miss critical differences in the time it takes to reach an equilibrium, as this time also depends on cellular turnover in growing but bounded populations. As the system reaches a stable manifold, the time to reach equilibrium depends on cellular death and birth rates. These rates shape the time scales, in particular, in coevolutionary dynamics of growth factor producers and free-riders. Replicator dynamics might be an appropriate framework only when birth and death rates are of similar magnitude. Otherwise, population growth effects cannot be neglected when predicting the time to reach an equilibrium, and cell-type-specific rates have to be accounted for explicitly.

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