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A rapid and selective HPLC-UV method for the quantitation of efavirenz in plasma from patients on concurrent HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis treatments.

Journal article
Authors Emile Bienvenu
Kurt-Jürgen Hoffmann
Michael Ashton
Pierre Claver Kayumba
Published in Biomedical chromatography : BMC
Volume 27
Issue 11
Pages 1554-9
ISSN 1099-0801
Publication year 2013
Published at Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Department of Pharmacology
Pages 1554-9
Language en
Links dx.doi.org/10.1002/bmc.2959
Subject categories Separation methods, Pharmacy

Abstract

Owing to heterogeneity in therapeutic response, efavirenz is of research and clinical interest. There is a need to quantitate it using noncostly and selective methods. A method for efavirenz quantitation in plasma containing HIV and tuberculosis drugs was developed. Chromatographic separation was carried out using a C18 column. The mobile phase consisted of 0.1% formic acid and acetonitrile, and was pumped at a flow rate of 0.3 mL/min. Efavirenz and ritonavir (internal standard) were monitored at 247 nm. Plasma proteins were precipitated by centrifugation. The analysis time was 6 min. The response was linear (r = 0.9997). The accuracy ranged between 98 and 115% (intraday) and between 99 and 117% (interday). The precision ranged from 1.670 to 4.087% (intraday) and from 3.447 to 13.347% (interday). Recovery ranged from 98 to 132%. Stability ranged between 99 and 123%. The selectivity was proven by analysis of drugs used for the management of HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis. Plasma sample analysis showed an efavirenz retention time of 5.57 min and a peak plasma concentration of 2.4 µg/mL occurring at 2 h. This method is rapid and selective, and thus suitable for monitoring efavirenz in patients with HIV/AIDS alone or co-infected with tuberculosis in a less resourced setting.

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