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Comparison of Apolipoprotein (apoB/apoA-I) and Lipoprotein (Total Cholesterol/HDL) Ratio Determinants. Focus on Obesity, Diet and Alcohol Intake.

Journal article
Authors Gianluca Tognon
Christina Berg
Kirsten Mehlig
Dag Thelle
Elisabeth Strandhagen
Jaana Gustavsson
Annika Rosengren
Lauren Lissner
Published in PloS one
Volume 7
Issue 7
Pages e40878
ISSN 1932-6203
Publication year 2012
Published at Institute of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine
Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science
Institute of Medicine, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine
Pages e40878
Language en
Links dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.004...
Subject categories Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology, Nutrition and Dietetics

Abstract

The ratio between apolipoprotein B and apolipoprotein A-I (apoB/apoA-I) has been suggested to be a powerful and more accurate predictor of future cardiovascular disease risk than total cholesterol and HDL cholesterol. Since diet and lifestyle can directly influence dyslipidemia, it is of interest to identify modifiable factors that are associated with high levels of the apolipoprotein ratio and if they can have a different association with a more traditional indicator of cardiovascular risk such as total cholesterol/HDL. The relationship between obesity and dyslipidemia is established and it is of interest to determine which factors can modify this association. This study investigated the cross-sectional association of obesity, diet and lifestyle factors with apoB/apoA-I and total cholesterol/HDL respectively, in a Swedish population of 2,907 subjects (1,537 women) as part of the INTERGENE study. The apolipoprotein and lipoprotein ratios were highly correlated, particularly in women, and obesity was strongly associated with both. Additionally, age, cigarette smoking and alcohol intake were important determinants of these ratios. Alcohol was the only dietary factor that appreciably attenuated the association between obesity and each of the ratios, with a stronger attenuation in women. Other dietary intake and lifestyle-related factors such as smoking status and physical activity had a lower effect on this association. Because the apolipoprotein and lipoprotein ratios share similar diet and lifestyle determinants as well as being highly correlated, we conclude that either of these ratios may be a sufficient indicator of dyslipidemia.

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