To the top

Page Manager: Webmaster
Last update: 9/11/2012 3:13 PM

Tell a friend about this page
Print version

Helicobacter pylori in an… - University of Gothenburg, Sweden Till startsida
Sitemap
To content Read more about how we use cookies on gu.se

Helicobacter pylori in ancient human remains

Journal article
Authors F. Maixner
Kaisa Thorell
L. Granehäll
B. Linz
Y. Moodley
T. Rattei
L. Engstrand
A. Zink
Published in World journal of gastroenterology
Volume 25
Issue 42
Pages 6289-6298
ISSN 2219-2840
Publication year 2019
Published at Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Infectious Medicine
Pages 6289-6298
Language en
Links dx.doi.org/10.3748/wjg.v25.i42.6289
Keywords Helicobacter pylori, Ancient DNA, Ancient gut contents, Coprolites, Evolution, Iceman
Subject categories Gastroenterology and Hepatology

Abstract

The bacterium Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infects the stomachs of approximately 50% of all humans. With its universal occurrence, high infectivity and virulence properties it is considered as one of the most severe global burdens of modern humankind. It has accompanied humans for many thousands of years, and due to its high genetic variability and vertical transmission, its population genetics reflects the history of human migrations. However, especially complex demographic events such as the colonisation of Europe cannot be resolved with population genetic analysis of modern H. pylori strains alone. This is best exemplified with the reconstruction of the 5300-year-old H. pylori genome of the Iceman, a European Copper Age mummy. Our analysis provided precious insights into the ancestry and evolution of the pathogen and underlined the high complexity of ancient European population history. In this review we will provide an overview on the molecular analysis of H. pylori in mummified human remains that were done so far and we will outline methodological advancements in the field of ancient DNA research that support the reconstruction and authentication of ancient H. pylori genome sequences. ©The Author(s) 2019. Published by Baishideng Publishing Group Inc. All rights reserved.

Page Manager: Webmaster|Last update: 9/11/2012
Share:

The University of Gothenburg uses cookies to provide you with the best possible user experience. By continuing on this website, you approve of our use of cookies.  What are cookies?

Denna text är utskriven från följande webbsida:
http://www.gu.se/english/research/publication/?publicationId=290519
Utskriftsdatum: 2020-07-07